Topics

Immigration

  • In St. Cloud, apartment shortage splits up families
    An area housing professional doesn't see a solution soon as developers and building owners likely don't think multi-bedroom, affordable rental housing, brings a big enough return.November 2, 2010
  • Mankato adjusts to growing diversity
    In the last decade, Mankato has attracted thousands of East African refugees and Latin American immigrants who are putting down roots and calling the area home.October 5, 2010
  • Minn. Somalis meet with FBI, denounce al-Shabab
    A group of elders in the Minneapolis Somali community on Wednesday publicly denounced al-Shabab, making it clear that they do not support the terror group they say is responsible for "sinister" acts of recruiting young Americans to fight in Somalia.September 1, 2010
  • Pew study: 95,000 illegal immigrants in Minnesota
    That number is down from an estimated 110,000 a year earlier. The numbers are deep in a national report that says illegal immigration has dropped for the nation as a whole, partly due to the poor economy.September 1, 2010
  • Feds arrest 370 criminal immigrants in Midwest bust
    Federal officials announced Friday they had arrested 370 immigrants who were in the U.S. illegally or convicted of other crimes as part of a three-day roundup in the Midwest.August 27, 2010
  • Eagan man admits harboring Mexican workers in his basement
    An Eagan man pleaded guilty Wednesday to harboring five Mexican workers who were in the country illegally.August 18, 2010
  • What does the 14th Amendment mean for us today?
    Several high-profile Republicans, including Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, are calling for a re-examination of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution. They are concerned the provision that guarantees citizenship for all persons born in the U.S. encourages "birth tourism" for expectant non-citizens. We'll discuss how the 14th Amendment has been interpreted and the politics of its challenges.Midmorning, August 12, 2010
  • 'Official-English' push in Lino Lakes tied to alleged anti-immigration front
    A national advocacy group called ProEnglish, which helped officials in Lino Lakes write an English-only resolution, is tied to other organizations that call for a cap on federal immigration levels.August 2, 2010
  • In their own words: Former P-9 Union members
    Judy Himle, Ken Dalager, Bob Taylor are part of a group former Local P-9 union members who have been meeting since the meatpackers strike in 1985. This was a recording of a conversation during their breakfast meeting on May 18, 2010.August 2, 2010
  • St. Cloud's history of friction with outsiders
    Many people who have moved to St. Cloud say fitting in isn't easy -- regardless of one's race, ethnicity, or religion. Given their different appearance, culture and faith, Somalis and Muslims have had a particularly difficult time.July 30, 2010
  • Undocumented students help peers navigate college
    Teenagers who grow up in this country as illegal immigrants don't qualify for federal grants or loans. They can't do work-study. But a group of students is showing their peers that college can be done.July 30, 2010
  • English-only proposal divides Lino Lakes residents
    The northern Twin Cities suburb of Lino Lakes could be the first city in Minnesota to declare English as its official language -- an idea that has divided residents in the community of about 19,000.July 26, 2010
  • Ariz. law comes after years of mounting anger
    As the days tick down until the Arizona immigration law takes effect, the state stands as a monument to the anger over illegal immigration that is present in so many places.July 25, 2010
  • Suspects in Minn. terror case go free with conditions
    When Minnesota Somalis began traveling to their war-torn homeland to take up arms nearly three years ago, authorities feared they might someday return as domestic terrorists. But recent court activity suggests at least some of the men are not as dangerous as once feared.July 17, 2010
  • Unitarian leader on inclusion's challenges
    Unitarian Universalist Association President Peter Morales talks about how the religious sect continues to grow. He leads a church that has no creed and, according to Morales, encourages differences of opinion on issues of spirituality and politics.Midmorning, June 24, 2010

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

Marketplace

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland

Services