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Withdrawn Candidates
DocumentCarol Moseley Braun
Fmr. U.S. Senator (D-IL)
Document Wesley Clark
Ret. Army General (D-AR)
DocumentHoward Dean
Fmr. Governor (D-VT)
DocumentJohn Edwards
U.S. Senator (D-NC)
DocumentDick Gephardt
U.S. Representative (D-MO)
DocumentBob Graham
U.S. Senator (D-FL)
DocumentDennis Kucinich
U.S. Representative (D-OH)
DocumentJoe Lieberman
U.S. Senator (D-CT)
DocumentAl Sharpton
Political Activist (D-NY)
In the Spotlight

News & Features
Campaign 2004

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Document Michael Badnarik
Computer consultant (L-TX)
DocumentGeorge W. Bush
President (R-TX)*
Document David Cobb
Attorney (G-TX)
DocumentJohn Kerry
U.S. Senator (D-MA)
DocumentRalph Nader
Consumer advocate (I-CT)

Election Results

Audio Highlights

Audio Final presidential debate (10/13/04)
George W. Bush and John Kerry debated in Tempe, Arizona.
Audio Second presidential debate (10/8/04)
George W. Bush and John Kerry held their second debate in St. Louis, Mo.
Audio Vice presidential debate, Cleveland, Ohio (10/5/04)
John Edwards and Dick Cheney meet in their only debate.
Audio First presidential debate, Miami, Florida (9/30/04)
George W. Bush and John Kerry's first of three debates.
Audio Johnston, Iowa (1/4/04)
Seven Democratic candidates debated, two weeks before the Iowa caucuses.
Audio New Hampshire (12/9/03)
Eight of the Democratic candidates ganged up on front-runner Howard Dean
Audio NY Debate (9/25/03)
Ten Democratic candidates for president debate in New York, sponsored by MSNBC.
Your Voice
Document What goals would you set for President Bush? What focus would you like to see? What do you want from the 2004 administration?
News Headlines

After a long battle with U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., President George W. Bush won re-election as president of the United States on Election Day - November 2, 2004. Bush won with about 51% of the vote, to Kerry's 48%. Minnesota was one of a handful of swing states nationwide. After dozens of visits by the top-of-the-ticket candidates and their surrogates, it was Kerry who won Minnesota with 51% of the vote.

The November election capped a year-long sprint that at one point featured about 10 candidates. Kerry won the Democratic nomination for president in July. In winning the nomination, Kerry survived several shake-ups of his campaign after former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean spent most of 2003 as the frontrunner. But the Iowa caucuses, and an ill-timed scream, doomed Dean, and forced out Sen. Richard Gephardt. And Kerry rolled on Super Tuesday. Kerry's coronation at the convention in Boston that set up the November showdown with President. Bush. Republicans held their convention in New York City in late August.

Cheney and Edwards face off
The vice presidential candidates meet in their one and only debate on Tuesday night. The event highlights the varying views voters have of how important the second on the ticket is to the presidency.
Independent organizations are scaling back political TV ads
With the election just a month away, many voters may feel like they're being bombarded with campaign ads. Yet one Twin Cities television executive says political ad buys are down from both the 2002 and 2000 elections. And some interest groups say they're not spending as much money on television ads this year.
Giuliani unleashes on Kerry in Minnesota stop
On the heels of Sen. John Kerry's strong debate performance, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani came to battleground Minnesota on Friday hoping to reinforce doubts about the Democratic presidential candidate's fitness to be commander in chief.
Nobel winner says Bush is politicizing science
The 2003 Nobel Prize winner in chemistry criticized President Bush on Friday for politicizing science. Minnesota native Peter Agre spoke to students and faculty at St. Olaf College on Thursday and the University of Minnesota on Friday. He is one of 25 leading scientists who are touring the country speaking about the future of science under the Bush administration.
An analysis of the first presidential debate
We have analysis of George W. Bush and John Kerry's first debate at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. We also play the debate, which focuses on matters of foreign policy, in its entirety.
What hath Hewitt wrought?
The director of the first televised presidential debate watched the first 2004 presidential debate in South Dakota. Don Hewitt was at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion. He was the recipient of the 2004 Al Neuharth award for Excellence in Journalism. Hewitt is the creator of the CBS news program "60 Minutes" and he produced the 1960 debate between John Kennedy and Richard Nixon.
Undecided voter still undecided after first presidential debate
Many undecided voters watched President George W. Bush and Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry at last night's presidential debate. Polls suggest undecided voters make up roughly ten percent of the voting public, and could tip the election in many battleground states like Minnesota. Earlier this week, Morning Edition aired a story about Joe Raasch and undecided voter from Shakopee. In the story, he said he was looking forward to the debates to help him make up his mind. Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer spoke with Raasch who says the debate last night was not enough to get him to commit.
Style as significant as substance in presidential debates
Who "wins" the first presidential debate may depend as much on style as substance. And when it comes to style, the two candidates differ a great deal.
Bush, Kerry clash on Iraq war in first of three debates
Sen. John Kerry accused President Bush Thursday night of a "colossal error in judgment" by ordering the invasion of Iraq. "The world is better off without Saddam Hussein," the president shot back in campaign debate, adding his rival once said so himself.
On eve of first Kerry-Bush debate, Cheney comes calling
Vice President Dick Cheney made a couple of campaign stops in Minnesota on Wednesday. In the Twin Cities suburb of Lake Elmo, Cheney met with a handful of small business owners. He defended the war on terrorism and talked about ways to make health care more affordable. Later Cheney and his wife Lynne, appeared at a Town Hall Forum at a small plane manufacturer in Duluth.
Slicing the spin: health care
President Bush and Democratic presidential candidate Kerry have varying proposals on how the uninsured should be covered by health insurance and how much the government should spend. Midmorning's guests take a look at the proposals and what they might mean.
Campaign 2004: Health Care
The rising cost and lack of availability of health care is a huge problem. The solution has eluded Washington lawmakers for more than a decade. Both presidential candidates are talking about the problem and proposing dramatically different solutions. As part of a Midmorning series, Slicing the Spin, MPR's Mark Zdechlik looks at those differences.
Preparing for a presidential debate
George Bush and John Kerry have scaled back their campaign activities this week in order to prepare for the first presidential debate on Thursday. Both campaigns have a great deal riding on the debates and are having their candidates practice their arguments against stand-ins for their opponents. We get a behind-the-scenes look at the preparations for some past presidential and vice presidential debates.
Heinz Kerry makes Twin Cities stop
Teresa Heinz Kerry didn't talk politics during a Monday afternoon visit. Instead she chatted with a group of kids who work at a community youth garden.
Countdown to the first presidential debate
George W. Bush and John Kerry have begun boning up for the first of three presidential debates, to be held on Thursday evening in Coral Gables, Fla. Their first face off focuses on issues of national security and is expected to draw more television viewers than either party's political convention. With more eyes glued to them than ever before in this election, what will the candidates be trying to accomplish?

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