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Attorney General: Jeff Johnson


SNAPSHOT
Rep. Jeff Johnson is giving up what many consider to be a safe seat in District 43A in the Minnesota House to run for attorney general. Johnson is finishing up his third term in the Legislature.

Johnson's campaign Web site takes direct aim at the DFL incumbent Mike Hatch: "It's time to return the Minnesota attorney general's office back to its once proud tradition of focusing on the practice of law and the protection of Minnesotans. This important office should not be about partisanship and political advancement as it has been for the past eight years. I will concentrate every day on keeping Minnesotans safe from criminals and will treat the office and its attorneys with the respect they deserve."

In the September 2006 primary, Johnson survived a scare from challenger Sharon Anderson. Johnson received 58 percent of the Republican votes.

Candidate Bio

Rep. Jeff Johnson
Political affiliation:
Republican Party
Born:
1966, Detroit Lakes, Minn.
Personal:
Married to Sondi. Two children.
Lutheran
Resides in Plymouth.
Occupation:
Johnson is an attorney who owns Midwest Employment Resources. Mediator.
Education:
B.A. Concordia College, 1989(economics); JD, Georgetown University Law School, 1992.
Major political experience:
First elected to the Minnesota House of Representatives in 2000.

Campaign Contribution Report

Total receipts
$199,624
Cash on hand
$116,219
Source: Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board 2006

Links and Resources

Campaign Web site:
Document johnsonforag.org
Votetracker - Jeff Johnson
Document See his latest legislative record

Candidate Pages

A protege of outgoing Attorney General Mike Hatch defeated a tough-on-crime state legislator in Minnesota's race for the state's top lawyer Tuesday, and Democrats swept Republicans out of the secretary of state and auditor's offices. (11/08/2006)
Lori Swanson
A new Minnesota Public Radio/Pioneer Press poll shows DFLer Lori Swanson with an increasing lead in the race for attorney general. (11/02/2006)
Attorney General debate
During a debate on Minnesota Public Radio's Midmorning program, Lori Swanson said Jeff Johnson supported a bill as a state legislator that was aimed at limiting stem cell research at the University of Minnesota. Johnson accused Swanson of resorting to wedge issues. (10/10/2006)
A new Minnesota Public Radio/Pioneer Press poll shows DFLer Lori Swanson leading in the race for attorney general, but more than a third of the surveyed voters are undecided. (09/26/2006)
Democratic attorney general candidate Lori Swanson held an 18 percentage point lead over Republican Jeff Johnson in a new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll, but 18 percent of those polled were still undecided. (09/19/2006)
In a crowded field, the three candidates for attorney general have much different opinions on use of the death penalty. (09/19/2006)
Republican attorney general hopeful Jeff Johnson made clear Friday he would try to turn the race into a referendum on outgoing Attorney General Mike Hatch, whose top deputy is the Democratic nominee. (09/15/2006)
Minnesota Solicitor General Lori Swanson will take on Rep. Jeff Johnson. But the closest race was in the Independence Party. (09/13/2006)
A bill passed by the House and Senate would prohibit anyone under the age of 17 from renting or buying some video games. Store owners would also have to post signs about the age restriction. (05/18/2006)
As part of the Minnesota Chamber's Business Day at the Capitol on April 6, 2006, Rep. Jeff Johnson and Rep. Matt Entenza debated issues in their race for attorney general. (04/06/2006)
A group of state lawmakers, civil rights leaders and business owners is getting behind a proposal that would make it harder for local governments to take private property from one group and give it to another private entity. (01/05/2006)
A debate in the Minnesota House started as an attempt to place certain cold remedies behind pharmacy counters, to make it harder for meth manufacturers to obtain the pseudoephedrine crucial to making their drugs. It ended with a sweeping ban on many everyday medications. (04/22/2005)