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Session 2005

Session 2005: Budget



Gov. Tim Pawlenty's $30 billion budget proposal promises to wipe out an expected $700 million deficit without raising state taxes. But critics say the governor is merely pushing costs down to cities, counties and school boards. (01/25/2005)
Gov. Tim Pawlenty is banking on casino money as a way to balance the state's finances. His budget plan, introduced Tuesday, includes a proposed Twin Cities casino that would be run jointly by the state and interested northern Indian tribes. (01/25/2005)
Gov. Pawlenty's $29.6 billion budget follows through on his pledge to "rein in" the costs of health care. He proposes reducing eligibility for people on state health care programs, and cutting payments to hospitals. Critics say Pawlenty's proposal will shift costs to other health care areas. (01/25/2005)
Gov. Tim Pawlenty released a proposed two-year budget Tuesday that depends on money from a new casino to help erase a projected $700 million deficit. Pawlenty's budget wouldn't raise state taxes, but relies on a mix of spending cuts and revenue increases to balance the budget. (01/25/2005)
When Gov. Tim Pawlenty proposes his budget on Tuesday, he will likely spark a debate and put into sharp relief two starkly different fiscal philosophies. Should resources be pooled and redistributed, or collected and controled at the local level? Does Minnesota have a revenue problem or a spending problem? Is private initiative or public investment the best path to prosperity? ( 01/24/2005)
With a dose of caution, state finance officials released a report Monday showing stronger-than-expected revenue collections in November and December. (01/10/2005)
The 84th Minnesota Legislature convened Tuesday with pledges of bipartisanship, followed in the House by a slew of party-line votes. Legislators from both parties say Minnesotans expect them to work together and accomplish something this session. Whether they can accomplish that is still unclear. (01/04/2005)
Lawmakers are returning to St. Paul to convene the 84th Minnesota Legislature on Tuesday. The principal order of business will be crafting a two-year state budget that's currently projected to run at least $700 million short. (01/03/2005)
A looming $700 million deficit anticipated in Minnesota's next budget cycle has reframed the debate on how much government the state can afford. (12/13/2004)
Minnesota is headed into a fourth straight year of budget deficits. State officials Wednesday projected a $700 million shortfall during the upcoming two-year budget cycle. The budget news has led to a chorus of interest groups calling for tax increases of some sort to plug the leak. (12/02/2004)
The new $700 million deficit projection is larger than legislative leaders had predicted, and could set the stage for another round of contentious budget talks next session. (12/01/2004)

Session 2005

DocumentSession 2005 Home
DocumentBonding
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DocumentEducation
DocumentHealth Care
DocumentSocial Issues
DocumentState Shutdown
DocumentStadiums
DocumentTransportation

Video from the Capitol

Audio Live House video (Windows Media)

Audio Live Senate video (RealPlayer)

Audio Highlights

Audio Rep. Dan Dorman
The size of Pawlenty's bonding proposal (1/4/05)

Audio Rep. Barb Sykora and Sen. Steve Kelley
Education (1/4/05)

Audio Sen. Steve Murphy
Transportation issues (1/4/05)

Audio Rep. Fran Bradley
Health care initiatives (1/4/05)

Audio Sen. Larry Pogemiller
Funding issues (1/4/05)

Audio Rep. Jim Knoblach and Sen. Dick Cohen
The budget and human services (1/4/05)

Audio Rep. Andy Westerberg
Prospects for new stadiums (1/4/05)

Audio Sen. Michele Bachmann
Same-sex legislation (1/4/05)