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Friday, September 7, 2012

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National Public Radio Stories

  • Obama Wants 4 More Years To Fix Nation's Problems
    President Obama has accepted his party's nomination for a second term. In his speech at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday night, he said the path he suggests is "harder, but it leads to a better place." He said the progress he'd made so far would be reversed if Mitt Romney won the White House.
  • Vermont Community Divided Over Hosting F-35s
    Many air bases across the country are clamoring to get the next generation of fighter jets. But the Burlington, Vt. area is bitterly divided over being one of the Air Force's preferred locations. Some residents say there are enough problems already with the F-16s — like noise.
  • Thousands Of Shut-Outs Watch Obama Speech On TV
    President Obama accepted his party's nomination for a second term at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday night. Due to a change in venue for Obama's speech, as many as 60,000 holders of community credentials were not allowed inside the arena. Instead, they had to watch the speech on TV.
  • Strike Costs Lufthansa $20 Million A Day
    For the second time this week, flight attendants on the German airline Lufthansa are on strike. That means about 1,000 flights will be canceled Friday, according to Business Week. Flight crews say they haven't had a raise in three years.
  • Amazon Rolls Out Its New Kindle E-Readers
    The new Amazon Kindles are faster, less expensive and are aimed squarely at the youngest members of a family. The least expensive model will sell for $69. The Kindle Fire comes with parental controls For instance, you can set a time limit on games or movies but let your kids read as much as they want.
  • Wahahah Founder Laughs All The Way To The Bank
    Wahaha is the name of China's third largest beverage company — it sells soda, juice and other bottled drinks. The name means laughing children. Zong Qing Hou is now the richest man in China, according to Bloomberg's billionaire's index. He founded Wahaha 25 years ago, with a $22,000 loan.
  • Close Read: Examining Obama's Acceptance Speech
    For a close read of President Obama's acceptance speech, Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne talk to NPR White House Correspondent Scott Horsley, Health Policy Correspondent Julie Rovner, and Business Correspondent Yuki Noguchi. We're checking meanings behind some of the phrases, as we did with Mitt Romney's speech one week ago.
  • 2012 Paralympics Best-Attended Since Games Began
    More than 4,200 athletes from 164 countries are taking part in the Paralympics. Disabled athletes began competing when a doctor in Britain organized the international wheelchair games to coincide with the 1948 Olympics. Renee Montagne talks to Baroness Tanni Grey Thompson, a former wheelchair racer who is in the British House of Lords, about the games.
  • Recess In Chicago? Strike Threat Draws National Eyes
    Teachers say they will walk out Monday if tense weekend negotiations don't bring a contract. School has already begun in the district, and the stakes are high. It would be the first Chicago teachers strike in 25 years, and with similar conflicts brewing nationwide, it may be a catalyst for other actions.
  • Next President Will Still Have To Work With Congress
    One question on the minds of voters is what kind of relationship the administration of the next four years will have with Congress after the stalemate of the last two. National Review senior editor and Bloomberg columnist Ramesh Ponnuru talks to Steve Inskeep about what he thinks will happen if President Obama is re-elected or if Mitt Romney wins.

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