Morning Edition
Morning Edition
Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Will Surveillance Disclosure Lead To More Oversight Of NSA?
    When surveillance laws were revised in 2012, Congress expressed great concerns that without proper oversight intelligence agencies would engage in the sort of monitoring that has been uncovered in recent days. Congress put a number of safeguards in place, but rejected others that would have guarantee more public discussion about what the NSA does.
  • How The Senate Farm Bill Would Change Subsidies
    The Senate passed legislation Monday that would do away with direct payments to farmers and instead create an expanded crop insurance program. It's designed to protect farmers from losses, but some say it amounts to a highly subsidized gift to agribusiness.
  • As Government Surveillance Powers Grow, Privacy Is Redefined
    Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the public has had several glimpses of the government's growing surveillance powers. The Bush administration had a program so secret, it dispensed with judicial warrants altogether. The resulting scandals and lawsuits appear to have done little to roll back the spying.
  • Churches Reconsider Sponsoring Boy Scout Troops
    Some churches have said they will end their affiliation with the Boy Scouts after its decision to allow openly gay members to join. Others, including Southern Baptists, are considering their next move. Another group plans to hold a meeting in Louisville later this month with parents who say they want a more Christian organization for their children.
  • Disruptive Broadway Audiences Master Stage Whisper
    Cell phone rings. Loud talking. Candy wrappers crinkling. Even fights in the aisles. Have Broadway audiences gotten ruder?
  • Inmates In A Venezuelan Prison Build A World Of Their Own
    In Latin America, it's said the only part of a prison the guards control is the gate, leaving convicts to fend for themselves. The inmate boss of one prison takes NPR's Steve Inskeep on a tour.
  • Lululemon To Replace CEO
    On Monday, the company announced that CEO Christine Day will step down once a replacement is found. This comes after an embarrassing year for the company which makes fashionable yoga-wear. A recent recall of see-through plants could cost the company $40 million.
  • National Envelope Hopes To Lick Bankruptcy Filing
    National Envelope, the largest privately-held manufacturer of envelopes in the U.S., has filed for bankruptcy protection. It's a sign of the paperless, digital times. It previously filed for Chapter 11 protection in 2010.
  • Post Recession, Architects Return To The Drawing Board
    While some jobs are coming back in this economy, the market for many architects remains tough. There were nearly 220,000 people working in the field in 2008. Today, more than 25 percent of those jobs are gone.
  • Estate On Palm Beach's Billionaire Row Sells For A Bargain
    Florida's housing market is picking up in places, but a home in Palm Beach just sold for more than 40 percent less than the asking price. The 20,000 square foot home was originally on the market for $74 million. According to The Wall Street Journal, it sold on Friday for a mere $42 million.

Program Archive
  
June 2013
S M T W T F S
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30            
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland

Resources

Services