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Morning Edition
Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Family Matters: Pitching In To Take Care Of Grandma
    Sharing the duties of caring for the family's 87-year-old matriarch has brought the Martin family closer together. Everyone in the multigenerational household, including the teenage kids, lends a hand. But the situation is also forcing the Harrisburg, Pa., family to think about the future in new ways.
  • Listening To Parents Key To Financial Responsibility
    Mothers and fathers can make a difference in whether their kids become spenders or savers, studies have found. Young people whose families had included them in conversations about money and budgets were much more likely to make more responsible financial decisions in the future.
  • The First Lady Cultivates 'American Grown' Gardening
    One of the first things Michelle Obama did as first lady was to dig up part of the beautifully manicured South Lawn of the White House and plant a vegetable garden. In her new book she says America has a long, proud history of gardening and it's time to reconnect with it.
  • Drawn To Sweets Or Fats? Blame Your Genes
    A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds certain genes may predict a person's food choices and eating habits. Two genes in particular, which are associated with obesity, were significantly associated with more snacks per day from fats and sweets — as well as more servings from dairy and meat.
  • Texas Senate Hopefuls Woo Republicans Of All Stripes
    Three major Republican candidates are vying to replace Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, who's retiring after serving for nearly 20 years. The front-runner is the state's lieutenant governor, who's backed by the GOP establishment. Challenging him are a Tea Party conservative and a former mayor of Dallas.
  • Edward Sharpe And The Magnetic Zeros Are 'Here'
    David Greene profiles the 12-member indie-folk band, which just released its second album, Here. It's the first of two albums the group will release this year.
  • Virus Infects Computers Throughout Middle East
    Researchers have discovered what they're calling the largest and most sophisticated cyber weapon ever unleashed. It's called Flame, and it's been infecting computers throughout the Middle East — especially in Iran. Analysts describe it as an "attack toolkit" that conceals itself in massive amounts of code and gathers all kinds of information.
  • How Firms Can Recover From High-Tech Stumbles
    Bloomberg News technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky talks to David Greene about what happens when good gadgets go bad. Whether it's failed hardware or software, how a company handles a botched release has become increasingly important.
  • Sotheby's To Auction An Original Apple Computer
    Sotheby's is auctioning off an Apple I computer that first came onto the scene in 1976. It's expected to fetch up to $180,000. About six in existence still function.
  • Dire Predictions Amid Another Looming Fiscal Battle
    The Bush-era tax cuts expire at the end of the year, along with the payroll tax break; the nation's borrowing authority bumps against its limit; and huge mandatory spending cuts — half targeting defense — are set to kick in. All this could trigger another recession, but Congress is unlikely to do much about it until after November's election.

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