All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Oakdale shooting sceneEvaluating mental health of crime suspects a tough task
    Each year in Minnesota, dozens of people accused of committing gun-related crimes are evaluated to determine if they are mentally competent enough to stand trial.3:20 p.m.
  • Clancey'sAppetites: Go beyond burgers and brats this grilling season
    Unless you relish brushing snow off your grill, our outdoor cooking season is pretty much a flash in the pan. Go beyond the usual burgers and brats with these ideas.3:53 p.m.
  • Stravinsky and Nijinsky'When Stravinsky Met Nijinsky;' how a ballet started a riot
    One hundred years ago today, the world premiere of "The Rite of Spring" in Paris shook the orchestral world and, according to some, launched the modern dance movement. It also sparked a riot in the Parisian streets. The collaboration between composer Igor Stravinsky and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky is the subject of a new children's book by Minnesota author Lauren Stringer.4:50 p.m.
  • Michele BachmannBachmann's presidential ambitions may have cost her
    The seeds of Michele Bachmann's announcement today to not seek re-election to her congressional seat may have been planted in Iowa more than a year ago. That's where Bachmann's run for the Republican presidential nomination briefly propelled her into frontrunner status. But it also dealt a severe blow to her political career back home and led to a series of investigations that are still underway.5:23 p.m.
  • Oakdale shooting sceneEvaluating mental health of crime suspects a tough task
    Each year in Minnesota, dozens of people accused of committing gun-related crimes are evaluated to determine if they are mentally competent enough to stand trial.5:42 p.m.
  • Clancey'sAppetites: Go beyond burgers and brats this grilling season
    Unless you relish brushing snow off your grill, our outdoor cooking season is pretty much a flash in the pan. Go beyond the usual burgers and brats with these ideas.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Public Employee Unions Take Issue With Immigration Overhaul
    Workers on the front lines of the immigration system are raising concerns about the workload that would be created by the proposed changes. Some unions are calling on lawmakers to oppose a bill they say would make things worse, not better.
  • Obama's OPM Nominee Did Latino Outreach For Campaign
    President Obama has chosen to nominate Katherine Archuleta as director of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM). Archuleta served as national political director for Obama's 2012 reelection campaign. If confirmed, she would be the first Hispanic to serve as director of the OPM.
  • What's Under Youngstown May Help What's On Top
    City leaders in Youngstown, Ohio, are hoping that by leasing land to drilling companies, they might generate funds to demolish vacant homes and buildings. Some refer to this as "frackmolishing," and opponents worry the drilling will cause environmental damage.
  • Tea Party Firebrand Bachmann Won't Seek Fifth Term
    Tea Party favorite and former presidential candidate Michele Bachmann announced that she would not run for re-election to her Minnesota House seat. Bachmann was facing a tough fight, having barely beaten an unknown Democrat in a district that Republican nominee Mitt Romney carried by 15 points.
  • Online Currency Exchanges Hide Traces Of Money As It Moves
    Melissa Block talks to Kara Scannell, U.S. regulatory correspondent with the Financial Times about the case officials are calling the largest online money-laundering case in history, involving the currency exchange, Liberty Reserve.
  • End Of Arms Embargo Against Syria Angers Russia
    Responding to criticism of their arms supplies to Syria, the Russians argue that they are providing defensive weapons to a sovereign government under previously signed contracts, whereas the European Union is proposing to arm non-governmental groups, which, incidentally, include foreign terrorists.
  • Deep Differences Stall Talks Of Syrian Opposition Council
    A three-day meeting to reshape and strengthen the main Syrian opposition coalition has instead dragged on for six days, and the main thing that has been strengthened is the coalition's reputation for in-fighting. The coalition is trying to expand its membership, ratify a government-in-exile, pick a new president, and decide whether to attend June talks with the Syrian government. Several members have threatened to bolt the coalition in protest, and pressure from outside players, including the U.S., Europe and Gulf Arab countries, has thus far merely intensified the coalition's polarization.
  • For Tuskegee Airman George Porter, Failure Was Not An Option
    George Porter was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first black fighter pilots, and those who supported them, in American history. A mechanic during the war, Porter found ways with his colleagues to keep their planes airborne even as they were denied the tools needed to do their jobs.
  • Two Newspapers Battle It Out For The New Orleans Market
    Residents were outraged when The Times-Picayune cut its paper-and-ink edition to three days a week to focus on its website. Now the paper is facing a new competitor for the local media market — one based 80 miles away.
  • Smithfield Deal Highlights China's Reliance On U.S. Farmers
    A Chinese food company is buying Virginia-based Smithfield Foods in a deal valued at $4.7 billion. It's being called the largest acquisition of a U.S. company by a Chinese buyer, but the deal will likely face close scrutiny.

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