All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, April 29, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Where Rondo used to beCentral Corridor: In the shadow of Rondo
    Some African-Americans in St. Paul see parallels between the light-rail line planned for University Ave. and the construction of Interstate 94 in the 1950s, which plowed through the old Rondo neighborhood and still stirs emotions.3:35 p.m.
  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:44 p.m.
  • Anchee MinAnchee Min's personal view on 'The Good Earth' author
    Writer Anchee Min's latest novel, "Pearl of China," details the life of Nobel Prize-winner Pearl S. Buck. In the early 1930s Buck wrote "The Good Earth," and other books about life in China. Min says while much has been written about Buck's life, it's never been from a Chinese perspective.4:54 p.m.
  • Tom SmithColeman announces pick for new St. Paul police chief
    St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman announced his pick to serve as the city's new police chief Thursday morning.5:20 p.m.
  • Start-up advisor says ATS-Medtronic deal a good one
    At least one medical-device industry expert believes the $370 million deal for Medtronic to acquire ATS Medical was a good move for both companies.5:24 p.m.
  • Where Rondo used to beCentral Corridor: In the shadow of Rondo
    Some African-Americans in St. Paul see parallels between the light-rail line planned for University Ave. and the construction of Interstate 94 in the 1950s, which plowed through the old Rondo neighborhood and still stirs emotions.5:35 p.m.
  • Sarah PalinSarah Palin backs Emmer for governor
    One day before Republican delegates meet to back a candidate for governor, former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin is backing Tom Emmer's bid for governor.5:51 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S. Military Mobilized To Assist Oil Spill Cleanup
    The U.S. military has been called in to assist in the cleanup of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The federal government has declared the disaster a "spill of national significance" — meaning officials can tap resources nationwide to combat the oil slick. The spill is expected to reach the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana as soon as Friday.
  • Environmentalists Monitoring Oil Spill Impact
    Melissa Block talks to Robert Thomas, of the Center for Environmental Communication at Loyola University in New Orleans, about the potential effects the Deepwater Horizon oil spill will have on the wildlife and habitat of the coastal gulf ecosystem.
  • Israel Slows Construction In East Jerusalem
    Amid a diplomatic dispute between the U.S. and Israel over the expansion of Jewish housing in East Jerusalem, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is publicly claiming that there is no freeze in construction. But pro-settler groups say their building projects have suddenly become mired in red tape.
  • Formerly Banned Muslim Scholar Tours U.S.
    In 2004, Muslim academic Tariq Ramadan was banned from the U.S. when the Bush administration invoked the Patriot Act. Now, the ban is lifted and Ramadan is touring the U.S. explaining to American audiences why he calls Islam a Western religion. And he says he sees a lot of hope in Western Muslim communities.
  • Blacks Show New Trust In U.S. Government
    The number of African-Americans who have confidence in government is nearly twice the level of whites — a sharp turnaround from previous years. Blacks have never trusted government in the same way whites have, but their level of trust, or distrust, normally tracks that of white Americans.
  • Obama Eulogizes Civil Rights Icon Dorothy Height
    President Obama eulogized civil rights icon Dorothy Height on Thursday, as a woman who "deserves a place of honor in America's memory." Height died last week at the age of 98.
  • Debate Continues Around Facebook Privacy Changes
    There's been a lot of chatter about changes Facebook made to its privacy settings. For some people the controversy is overblown, but many say Facebook has gone too far. NPR's Andy Carvin looks at ways to adjust your settings to control access.
  • Jack White's Record Label: Old Sounds, New Tricks
    White's approach to the record business has been called a throwback and a harbinger of things to come. Most innovative companies in the business are digital in concept, but Third Man's approach is digital where necessary; tangible where possible.
  • Goldman CEO: Senate Hearing Was 'Humbling'
    Goldman Sachs heard more than 10 hours of grilling, lecturing and vitriol from senators on Capitol Hill earlier this week. The 140-year-old firm is fighting to maintain its reputation as being the smart leader and venerable institution of Wall Street. Michele Norris talks to CEO Lloyd Blankfein about lessons learned, the road ahead, and the relationship between Washington and Wall Street.
  • Democrats Introduce Campaign Finance Bill
    Democrats have introduced a bill to address the sluice gate opened by a Supreme Court decision earlier this year that rolled back limits on corporate campaign money.

Program Archive
  
April 2010
S M T W T F S
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30  
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

Marketplace

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland
Win Your Dinner Party

The Dinner Party Download™

A fast, funny digest of the week's most interesting news, cuisine, cocktails and culture.

Services