All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Nil Hasselmo HallCentral Corridor and the U: Clash of the Titans
    Of all the controversies facing the future Central Corridor light-rail line, a dispute with the University of Minnesota has received the most attention -- with good reason. Both the university and the Metropolitan Council are powerful public institutions, and their struggles to see eye to eye have complicated the state's largest ever public works project.3:35 p.m.
  • Nil Hasselmo HallCentral Corridor and the U: Clash of the Titans
    Of all the controversies facing the future Central Corridor light-rail line, a dispute with the University of Minnesota has received the most attention -- with good reason. Both the university and the Metropolitan Council are powerful public institutions, and their struggles to see eye to eye have complicated the state's largest ever public works project.5:35 p.m.
  • University Avenue ProjectA community stares at itself
    Wing Young Huie wants Minnesotans to see their neighbors. For the next six months, hundreds of his photographs of people who live along University Avenue in St. Paul will be displayed in windows along that very street. Organizers expect The University Avenue Project to change the city.5:48 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • In Midwest, Obama Touts Economic Policies
    President Obama spent Wednesday stumping the heartland in search of support for his economic policies. Michele Norris talks to NPR's Ari Shapiro, about the president's dash though Iowa, Missouri and Illinois.
  • How One Missouri Town Has Weathered Recession
    Democrat Dale Bagley is the mayor of Macon, Mo., and he was at the ethanol plant that President Obama toured Wednesday. Melissa Block talks to the mayor about the president's visit — and how his city has weathered the recession.
  • Nelson's Vote Against Financial Bill Debate Examined
    The proposed bill creates new derivatives rules that would apply retroactively. Among its biggest critics is Warren Buffett, whose company, Berkshire Hathaway, is Nelson's biggest single source of campaign funds. Nelson and his wife also have investments valued at $1.5 million or more in the company.
  • Thousands Line Up For Free Health Care In L.A.
    Thousands of people are lining up for free medical and dental care outside a Los Angeles sports arena this week, at a time when the city's fiscal outlook is bleak, and the regional unemployment rate is the highest in decades.
  • Federal Panel Weighs In On Alzheimer's Risk
    A panel convened by the National Institutes of Health says there's no sure way to prevent Alzheimer's disease or other forms of mental decline related to aging. The panel say it's possible that people can reduce their risk by exercising, staying mentally active, and watching their diets. But the evidence for that is pretty limited. Michele Norris talks to NPR's Jonathan Hamilton about the panel's findings.
  • Arizona Senate Candidate Defends Immigration Law
    Former GOP U.S. Rep. J.D. Hayworth, who is challenging incumbent Sen. John McCain in his party's Senate primary, says the law empowers the state to enforce existing federal immigration laws. But the measure has exposed rifts in the Republican Party.
  • Immigration Law Ignites Fury In Mexico
    Mexico's government has strongly condemned Arizona's controversial new anti-illegal-immigration law. Political leaders say Mexico must send a strong message to Washington that harassment of its citizens in Arizona will not be tolerated.
  • Rights Group Reports Abuses In Secret Iraq Prisons
    A Human Rights Watch report says detainees at a secret prison in Iraq were subjected to routine and systematic torture. The Baghdad prison was under the control of the Shiite-led Iraqi government; the detainees are Sunni. And the revelations are already inflaming sectarian tensions. Melissa Block talks to Samer Muscati, a researcher with Human Rights Watch, who interviewed several of the detainees.
  • The Destinies Of Two Men Who Share One Name
    Wes Moore escaped a rough-and-tumble childhood to become a model of achievement. Decorated combat veteran. White House Fellow. Business leader. Just after he learned he'd won a Rhodes Scholarship in late 2000, he also learned about another Wes Moore, who would soon be sentenced to life in prison. Michele Norris talks to Wes Moore the achiever — and now author of The Other Wes Moore — about his journey of discovery and friendship.
  • GOP Drops Opposition Over Financial Rules Debate
    Senate Republicans have dropped their objections to Democratic efforts to begin debate on a sweeping overhaul of financial regulations. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Audie Cornish.

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April 2010
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