All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S. Officials Hope HSBC Penalty Sends A Message
    One of Britain's largest banks has agreed to pay $1.9 billion to settle money laundering charges brought by U.S. officials. HSBC acknowledged that it transferred money for Mexican drug cartels and for countries such as Iran that are under international sanctions.
  • HSBC Officials Knowingly Dealt With Iranian Banks
    British bank HSBC has agreed to pay a record fine of $1.9 billion to settle an investigation by U.S. prosecutors. HSBC faced charges of laundering money for Mexican drug cartels and facilitating prohibited transactions with nations like Iran and Cuba. For more, Robert Siegel talks with Jimmy Gurule, law professor at the University of Notre Dame.
  • Spain's Civil Servants Draw Grumbles, And Envy
    Spain's economic crisis has helped drive the nation's unemployment rate above 25 percent. Many of the jobless resent the relatively high pay and job security public sector workers enjoy.
  • Berkeley Receives $1M For Undocumented Students
    The $1 million gift will help 200 students pay tuition and living expenses to stay enrolled at the University of California, Berkeley. While some undocumented students call the scholarship fund a game changer, not everyone is applauding.
  • Bruno Mars Goes Anyplace And Everyplace On 'Jukebox'
    On his second album, Unorthodox Jukebox, Mars traverses the pop landscape, pulling in far-flung influences and making them his own.
  • Police Criticized For Firing 137 Shots In Car Chase
    Some Cleveland residents are calling for a federal investigation following a lengthy car chase that ended badly. Police fired more than 100 rounds at a stopped car, killing the driver and passenger. Some in the community are troubled by what they say are racial overtones in the case.
  • In Freedom, Ex-Felon Becomes Probation Counselor
    The federal probation office in St. Louis has one of the biggest caseloads of violent offenders in the country — and one of the lowest recidivism rates. That's in part because of a former felon who knows how to keep ex-offenders from returning to prison.
  • Small Businesses Might Still Hire If Taxes Are Raised
    President Obama has said it over and over — to help balance the federal budget, the wealthiest Americans should pay more in taxes. Republicans frame it a different way and say raising those taxes would hit small businesses, making them less likely to hire new workers.
  • Venezuela's Chavez Headed For More Cancer Surgery
    Battling cancer, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has for the first time named a successor — his vice president. The charismatic, socialist leader with aspirations of regional leadership is in Cuba undergoing a fourth round of surgery. Vice President Nicholas Maduro is a former bus driver who rose through the ranks of his union to national prominence. In an emotional speech, Chavez appealed to his countrymen to elect Maduro to the highest office when Chavez can no longer govern. Audie Cornish talks to Juan Forero.
  • Sudanese Teens Fight To Play Basketball In Illinois
    A tiny residential school in Illinois has successfully fought to keep three Sudanese basketball players on its team. The head of the Illinois High School Association initially ruled that Mooseheart High school illegally recruited the teenagers, who are all 6 feet 7 inches and taller.

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