All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Job seekerChilling job market warms gubernatorial campaign
    Minnesota lost nearly 13,000 jobs in September, the third largest monthly job loss in more than 50 years.5:20 p.m.
  • Stinson on jobs picture
    Despite the apparent gloomy jobs report, there were still more jobs in Minnesota this September than there were a year ago. Minnesota State Economist Tom Stinson watches these numbers and joined Tom Crann for a discussion (Note: Audio can be found in Laura McCallum's article above).5:23 p.m.
  • Frontrunner?Wetterling the frontrunner in the 6th?
    A new poll shows Patty Wetterling is the frontrunner in the 6th District race. But Republicans say the poll isn't credible.5:26 p.m.
  • Mesaba in court
    Lawyers for Mesaba Airlines and its unions are in bankruptcy court, debating whether the pilots', flight attendants' and mechanics' unions can strike if the company unilaterally imposes pay and benefit cuts on them. Tom Crann talks with MPR reporter Martin Moylan.5:45 p.m.
  • Vaccine researchPlan tackles the ethical questions in a flu pandemic
    If a bird flu pandemic breaks out, experts say there won't be enough life-saving vaccine to go around. Who should be the first to get vaccine?5:52 p.m.
  • Health industry calling more attention to medical mistakes
    There's been a lot of attention on medical mistakes, and transparency in their reporting. And some of the attention lately is coming from within the medical profession.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Bush Signs Terrorism Tribunal Bill
    President Bush signs into law sweeping legislation that enables the United States to detain, interrogate and try terrorism suspects. The package was approved by Congress two weeks ago. Experts say the ultimate test of Bush's detainee policy will probably come in the courts. But for now, the president has the free hand he has insisted he needs. NPR's Don Gonyea reports.
  • With Interrogation Rules Set, U.S. Moves Ahead
    Military commissions are far from new, even in the war against terrorism. Not long after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and the invasion of Afghanistan, U.S. authorities started taking prisoners and looking for a way to handle their cases.
  • Wal-Mart Bids to Acquire Large Retailer in China
    Wal-Mart will reportedly acquire the Chinese supermarket chain Trust-Mart. The deal would make Wal-Mart the largest foreign retailer in China; it currently has 66 stores there. If approved, the acquisition would give Wal-Mart more access to China's 1.3 billion consumers. Wal-Mart is paying $1 billion for the Taiwan-owned Trust-Mart.
  • How Would a Democrat-Led House Differ?
    Democrats, who controlled the House of Representatives for 40 years until the 1994 elections, feel that the 2006 election is their best chance since then to win it back. What would change in a Democratic-run House?
  • Local Elections Have Big Impact on Day-to-Day Life
    Enormous attention is being given to congressional and governorship races this election season. But Jim Hunt, a city council member in Clarksburg, W. Va., and the president of the National League of Cities, says there are thousands of local races that will have just as much -- or more -- impact on the day-to-day lives of constituents.
  • Chicago Mercantile to Acquire CBOT for $8 Billion
    The Chicago Mercantile Exchange is acquiring its cross-town rival, the Chicago Board of Trade, in a stock swap valued at $8 billion. Both organizations are institutions in Chicago. The two markets have competed for more than a century.
  • How Two Chicago Markets Came to Dominate
    In the mid-19th century, Chicago's Board of Trade set up shop with grain products; the Chicago Mercantile Exchange followed soon after with a focus on butter and eggs. Agricultural products still form part of each market's business.
  • Bargain-Hunting in San Diego's Real-Estate Slump
    After more than doubling in five years, home prices in San Diego have hit the brakes, and sales have slumped. But a few brave buyers see the chance for bargains as sellers grow more distressed.
  • Restaurateur Shares the Secret of His Success
    Danny Meyer has built an empire of 10 restaurants in cutthroat New York City. In his new book, Setting the Table, Meyer explains that more than good service, hospitality is what sets his eateries apart from others.
  • North Korea: Sanctions Are a 'Declaration of War'
    North Korea says it considers U.N. sanctions meant to punish the country for its nuclear test a "declaration of war." Japan and South Korea report that North Korea might be preparing to test a second nuclear weapon. Robert Siegel talks with Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Nicholas Burns.

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