All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Monday, September 26, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • In The Hunt For Al-Qaida, Drone Program Expands
    The U.S. military has had great success with drones in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan. Now the U.S. is planning to use them to track al-Qaida figures in places that include Somalia and Yemen.
  • Air Force And Navy Turn To Biofuels
    The military is trying to make big changes in what fuel it uses. The Air Force and Navy have been testing their aircraft — everything from fighters to unmanned spy planes — on fuel made from vegetable oil or even animal fat. One catch: It costs 10 times the price of traditional fuel.
  • Saudi Women To Receive Right To Vote — In 2015
    Businesswoman Nadia Bakhurji has wanted to run for public office in her native Saudi Arabia since 2004, when the country announced it would hold its first municipal elections in 40 years. But she was forced to withdraw her name when the government banned women from running for office — or voting. Melissa Block speaks with Bakhurji for her reactions to the Saudi king's statements over the weekend, vowing to extend women's suffrage.
  • Few Consumers Are Cracking The QR Code
    The pixelated images meant to be scanned on a smartphone to take the user to a website may be too involved for too little reward, branding consultants say. Though the codes are more prevalent, only 6 percent of mobile subscribers in the U.S. scan them, and a newer technology may soon overtake it.
  • Do This Summer's Disasters Hail Impending Doom?
    Commentator Andrei Codrescu reflects on the disasters and disaster coverage of the summer. He observes that it was a tough season, and we don't know what lies ahead: Will it be a return to normal or a further time of trouble? He wants a new drug to sort it all out.
  • From Progress To Problem: China's High-Speed Trains
    Nearly two months after a collision on China's high-speed-rail network killed 40 people, the government is still investigating why it happened. But critics blame the haste with which the network was built, corruption and a disregard for human life.
  • New York's New Shipping Plan Sparks Feud
    New York state is poised to implement new rules that could have a major impact on the global shipping industry. Invasive species sometimes move from place to place in "ballast water" — that's the water ships suck in and discharge to level their loads. Officials in New York want all that ballast water treated to kill any "living pollution" before it reaches their harbors. But the treatment technology is expensive and untested. Because the state serves as a gateway to the Great Lakes and ports in New Jersey, other states and countries are disputing the new rules.
  • First African Woman To Win Nobel Peace Prize Dies
    The first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, Wangari Maathai, has died while undergoing treatment for cancer. Maathai was an environmentalist and human rights campaigner who was arrested, imprisoned and beaten for her efforts in Kenya. She was 71. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton talks to Melissa Block.
  • 'Heart And Soul': An African-American History
    Illustrator and author Kadir Nelson tells the African-American story — from Colonial times through the civil rights movement — in his new children's book, Heart and Soul.
  • Congress Attempts To Avert Shutdown
    With FEMA running out of disaster money at some point this week and the whole federal government starting a new fiscal year on Saturday without an accompanying budget, Congress muddles through another budget standoff. NPR's Tamara Keith joins Michele Norris to bring us the latest.

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