All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Online shopperSenate poised to pass online sales tax bill
    The U.S. Senate is debating a bill that would to allow states to collect sales taxes from online retailers, a change designed to deliver billions of dollars of lost tax revenues. Both of Minnesota's senators support the bill, saying it will help brick-and-mortar retailers like Best Buy and Target, which are based in Minnesota.12:49 a.m.
  • Don SaundersAppetites: Snow puts a freeze on spring dining
    Unrelenting snow and sleet have made late April feel like February, and that means a seemingly endless winter for local diners who seek out seasonal food from our region.12:53 a.m.
  • HolocaustDrama of real Holocaust survival brought to Twin Cities stage
    Erwin Farkas was 10 years old when World War II began in 1939. His subsequent Holocaust survival is one of eight that have been woven together in a new Twin Cities theatrical production.1:54 a.m.
  • Tom Baak, Paul ThissenBonding bill's prospects take a hit in Minn. Senate
    Prospects for a bonding bill dimmed Wednesday, when Democrats in the Minnesota Senate added a cash allocation to their tax bill for one of the session's key bonding project proposals -- the renovation of the State Capitol Building.2:20 a.m.
  • Q&A: Why the anti-bullying bill faces opposition
    The Safe and Supportive Minnesota Schools Act, A statewide anti-bullying bill, is awaiting a floor vote in the Minnesota House and moving its way through the Senate.2:24 a.m.
  • Online shopperSenate poised to pass online sales tax bill
    The U.S. Senate is debating a bill that would to allow states to collect sales taxes from online retailers, a change designed to deliver billions of dollars of lost tax revenues. Both of Minnesota's senators support the bill, saying it will help brick-and-mortar retailers like Best Buy and Target, which are based in Minnesota.2:55 a.m.
  • Don SaundersAppetites: Snow puts a freeze on spring dining
    Unrelenting snow and sleet have made late April feel like February, and that means a seemingly endless winter for local diners who seek out seasonal food from our region.3:24 a.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S. Hesitant To Act On Claims Of Chemical Weapons In Syria
    The Syrian regime is facing more allegations that it's used chemical weapons in its ongoing civil war. A top Israeli intelligence official on Tuesday cited photographs of victims as evidence of sarin gas. But the Obama administration says it's looking for more "conclusive evidence" before deciding to take action. Fore more, Robert Siegel talks with Susan Glasser, editor in chief of Foreign Policy Magazine, and Charles Blair, Senior Fellow for State and Non-State Threats at the Federation of American Scientists.
  • Investigators Question Parents Of Boston Bombing Suspects
    Officials from the U.S. Embassy in Moscow were in Dagestan in southern Russia on Wednesday to question the parents of the Tsarnaev brothers.
  • As Myanmar Reforms, Old Tensions Rise To The Surface
    After decades of military rule, Myanmar is experiencing rapid economic and social reforms. But some now fear that long-suppressed ethnic and religious tensions will be hard to contain. Violence between Buddhists and Muslims that began in the western part of the country last year now appear to be spreading.
  • 'Yo' Said What?
    Some teens in the Baltimore area have been using "yo" as a gender-neutral pronoun.
  • SnapChat App Destroys Photos Seconds After Sending
    A photo app that delivers images meant to disappear once viewed has some parents and schools concerned. Snapchat moves over 100 million images a day — but critics say some of that might be sexual in nature. Youth Radio's Sunday Simon uses Snapchat, and reports on how her circle of friends views the controversy.
  • Philadelphia Case Exposes Deep Rift In Abortion Debate
    Abortion opponents say the case of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, who is charged with five counts of murder, shows the need for more and stricter regulation of abortion clinics. But abortion rights backers say more restrictions give women few choices besides substandard facilities.
  • Talib Kweli On Mainstream Hip-Hop And Honoring The Old School
    The New York rapper's political and layered rhymes have been pegged as "conscious rap," a label that has now become pejorative. His latest album challenges that image, paying homage to old-school hip-hop and working with the present.
  • Boston Response Praised, But Intelligence-Sharing Questioned
    Law enforcement officials have been given high marks for their response to the bombings at the Boston Marathon. But at the same time, questions are being raised about the coordination among federal agencies handling intelligence about the suspects in the months before the attack.
  • 'Taggants' In Gunpowder Might Have Helped Identify Bombers
    The Boston bombing probe might have been helped if the explosives were marked with microscopic identifiers called taggants. But the technology has long been off-limits, thanks to the National Rifle Association and its industry allies.
  • How Obama's Response To Terrorism Has Shifted
    While President Obama's time in office has not been defined by terrorist attacks, incidents like the one in Boston have been a regular, painful through line of his presidency. And the Obama administration has been on a steady learning curve when it comes to how to handle its public response.

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