All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, March 11, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Jefferson Elementary SchoolOfficials, schools ponder how to handle threats from other countries
    The Twin Cities case isn't the first time a school threat has been traced to a computer in another country. It raises questions about how quickly police and school officials are able to determine whether a threat is credible.3:49 p.m.
  • Downtown Fergus FallsJudge cancels special election on city projects vote
    Local residents in Fergus Falls wanted to impose a new ordinance requiring a citywide vote on major capital improvement projects, but a judge has cancelled the special election that would put the measure in place.3:55 p.m.
  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:44 p.m.
  • Denny HeckerHecker's former father-in-law intended to help investigation
    Unsealed court documents indicate Denny Hecker's former father-in-law intended to help law enforcement authorities investigating Hecker, but that was before William Prohofsky fatally shot himself in an apparent suicide last week.4:50 p.m.
  • Coffman Memorial UnionCalendar quirk will cost U of M $41M in payroll
    Because of a once in a decade quirk in the calendar, employees at the University of Minnesota will receive an extra pay check in the next fiscal year, and it could cost the university upward of $41 million.4:52 p.m.
  • Prison YardFilmmakers create a genre unknown in France
    Unlike the U.S., France has no tradition of prison movies. So recently when a film opened in French cinemas about a young man trying to survive in a brutal Paris prison it electrified audiences. Now Minnesota audiences can see the movie, called "A Prophet," when it opens this weekend.4:55 p.m.
  • Eric MagnusonMagnuson's tenure as chief justice short, but eventful
    During his two years at the helm of the Minnesota Supreme Court, Eric Magnuson has dealt with an ongoing series of budget cuts, the U.S. Senate recount, and an upcoming case challenging the governor's budget-cutting authority.5:20 p.m.
  • Jefferson Elementary SchoolOfficials, schools ponder how to handle threats from other countries
    The Twin Cities case isn't the first time a school threat has been traced to a computer in another country. It raises questions about how quickly police and school officials are able to determine whether a threat is credible.5:24 p.m.
  • The St. Croix RiverPlans for new St. Croix bridge headed back to drawing board
    Plans for a new St. Croix bridge near Stillwater appear to be heading back to the drawing board after a judge characterized the new bridge's visual effect as "dramatic and disruptive," contrary to the rivers protections under a federal program.5:51 p.m.
  • Payne familyLiberians again seek extension of protected status
    The clock is ticking once again for thousands of Liberian immigrants who've been living in the U.S. on a legal, but temporary, basis for years.5:55 p.m.
  • Denny HeckerHecker's former father-in-law intended to help investigation
    Unsealed court documents indicate Denny Hecker's former father-in-law intended to help law enforcement authorities investigating Hecker, but that was before William Prohofsky fatally shot himself in an apparent suicide last week.6:20 p.m.
  • Coffman Memorial UnionCalendar quirk will cost U of M $41M in payroll
    Because of a once in a decade quirk in the calendar, employees at the University of Minnesota will receive an extra pay check in the next fiscal year, and it could cost the university upward of $41 million.6:22 p.m.
  • Downtown Fergus FallsJudge cancels special election on city projects vote
    Local residents in Fergus Falls wanted to impose a new ordinance requiring a citywide vote on major capital improvement projects, but a judge has cancelled the special election that would put the measure in place.6:25 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Girls' Deaths Reignite Calls For More Predator Laws
    Two cases in California have renewed calls to strengthen laws designed to protect communities from sex offenders like John Gardner, who is charged in the murder of one teen and is being investigated in the death of another. But there's already a raft of laws, named after earlier victims. Legal experts say the laws in place should be better enforced.
  • Calif. Assemblyman On Sex Offender Record Change
    California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has ended the state's practice of destroying the parole records of convicted sex offenders a year after they finish their paroles. The move was prompted by Assemblyman Nathan Fletcher who urged the governor to make that change after a registered sex offender was charged in the murder of a San Diego teenager, and Fletcher discovered his parole file had been destroyed. Fletcher offers his insight.
  • Highway Deaths At Lowest Levels Since 1950s
    The Department of Transportation announced Thursday that the number of people killed in highway crashes last year was the lowest since 1954. Factoring in the number of miles traveled, it was the lowest fatality rate ever.
  • GOP Targets Democrats On Ethics, Earmarks
    House Republicans have launched a full-blown ethics offensive against the Democratic majority. The issues are ethics violations and spending earmarks, two lines of attack Democrats employed when they won control of Congress four years ago.
  • Ill. Democrats Accept Lt. Gov. Applications Online
    The man who won the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor in Illinois vacated the seat after he was accused of beating his wife. Democrats now have to fill the slot and are accepting online applications from anyone interested. Two candidates: state Rep. Arthur Turner, who came in second in the original race, and Jill Jaffe, an unemployed certified medical assistant with no political experience.
  • Karzai Extends Olive Branch To Pakistan
    Afghan President Hamid Karzai met Thursday with Pakistani leaders in Islamabad, offering fresh signs of a rapprochement in the often-stormy relationship between the two countries. At a news conference, he pleased his hosts by saying Pakistan should have a role in any negotiations for peace in Afghanistan.
  • Afghan Troops Earn Kudos, But Questions Remain
    NATO commanders in southern Afghanistan are sharing credit for the success of last month's offensive in Marjah with their Afghan counterparts. But there are still concerns about the Afghans' tactics and ability to coordinate with foreign troops on the battlefield.
  • World's Rich List Reflects Shifting Global Wealth
    The richest man in the world is no longer American. Forbes magazine's world's richest list has Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim on top. Microsoft founder Bill Gates and investor Warren Buffet occupy the second and third spots, respectively. Indian billionaires round off the top 5. Luisa Kroll, co-editor of the list, discusses the changing face of the world's richest people.
  • Letters: Medical School, Condoms
    Listeners respond to the story on the cost of medical school and New York City's competition to jazz up the wrapper design on the 40 million condoms the city hands out each year. Michele Norris and Robert Siegel read from listeners' e-mails.
  • Lionel Loueke: Jazz Meets African Rhythms On 'Mwaliko'
    The jazz guitarist draws on an extremely wide range of styles. From bebop to Brazilian rhythms to lyrical ballads to sounds from his native Benin, Loueke's latest album, Mwaliko, showcases the artist's inventive take on jazz.

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