The Big Story Blog

Romney whacks Obama; doesn't mention MN caucuses

Posted at 4:00 PM on February 1, 2012 by Paul Tosto
Filed under: Politics

Mitt Romney spoke for about 15 minutes at a campaign stop in Eagan today, attacking President Obama but apparently didn't mention next week's Minnesota caucuses.

Romney didn't mention MN caucus in 15min speech.
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Here are excerpts from the Star Tribune:

Fresh after cementing his front-runner status for the Republican presidential nomination, Mitt Romney made a campaign swing through the Twin Cities on Wednesday with his sights set clearly on President Obama.

"It's time for us to bring a new definition to hope," Romney told the cheering crowd. "Hope should mean a good job and good paycheck, not a faded word on an old bumper sticker."

Romney spoke for about 17 minutes in front of hundreds of Republican activists at a Freightmaster trucking warehouse in Eagan. The former Massachusetts governor made the visit less than a day after a resounding win in Florida's primary, handily defeating former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and Texas Rep. Ron Paul.

Romney never mentioned his Republican rivals, firmly challenging Obama's record during the last three years. He highlighted Obama's statement before taking office that if the economy didn't turn around, he'd likely be a one-term president.

Romney pledged to eliminate Obama's health care overhaul on his first day of office and "cut and eliminate government programs."

Before leaving, Romney led the crowd in singing part of "America the Beautiful."

Before Romney spoke, Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak held a news conference outside the warehouse blasting Romney, calling him a right-wing extremist who is out of synch with Minnesota and the nation.


About Paul Tosto

Paul Tosto

Paul Tosto writes the Big Story Blog for MPR News. He joined the newsroom in 2008 after more than 20 years reporting on education, politics and the economy for news wires and newspapers across the country.