Nikki Tundel Feature Archive

Most summer camps give kids a chance to experience new things. One in St. Paul lets them try out some old ones. (09/19/2009)
Each year, the fair's Lost and Found Office takes in hundreds of items -- from cell phones and car keys to baby strollers and Barbie dolls. Employees catalog and tag everything that's turned in. Then they simply wait, hoping the original owners will come claim their possessions. (09/09/2009)
Llamas are best known for their work as pack animals in the highlands of Peru. At the Minnesota State Fair, however, they've set aside the trekking supplies and don costumes instead. Reporter Nikki Tundel attended the fair's 4-H Llama Costume Contest and learned a lot about the long-necked mammals. (09/08/2009)
MPR's Nikki Tundel visited the Minnesota State Fairgrounds in the dead of January. (08/27/2009)
During World War II, several hundred women became WASPs in the Air Force, so they could fly military planes. Their efforts have gone unrecognized, until just recently. (08/13/2009)
To many, Andrew Moore is "that guy in south Minneapolis with all the stuff on his lawn." (08/11/2009)
Jan McCulloch works at the American Girl salon at the Mall of America. It's her job to pamper dolls and style their hair. And, yes, she gets paid for this. (07/20/2009)
A time capsule from 1934 was opened Tuesday at the Minneapolis Veterans Home. The lead box contained everything from military newspapers to a of memorial addresses by President Abraham Lincoln. (07/07/2009)
It's the goal of lenders to get these foreclosed home back on the market as quickly as possible. And the only way they can do that is with the help of "trash-out companies." (06/29/2009)
Tombstones used to simply offer the name of the dearly departed and maybe a carving of some religious icon. But these days, grave markers showcase everything from the deceased's hobbies to their favorite cartoon characters. (05/08/2009)
It's the job of state employment counselors to make sure that Minnesotans with disabilities have as good a chance of getting a job as anyone else. But the economic recession is making their mission much more difficult. (04/02/2009)
Americnas were outraged when troubled insurance company AIG paid top executives $165 million in bonuses. Some say this public outcry was a sign Americans have had enough of the country's super rich. (03/27/2009)
The U.S. Army recently made suicide prevention training mandatory for every single person in the service. (03/18/2009)
Some people ask their neighbors if they can borrow a cup of sugar. Anita O'Sullivan asked hers if she could direct them in a stage show. (03/06/2009)
In therapy sessions, on talk shows, even online, Americans are confessing their sins. It seems the only place not buzzing with mea culpas these days is the confessional booth. (02/27/2009)