Tom Scheck

Tom Scheck

Reporter
Minnesota Public Radio
tscheck@mpr.org


Tom Scheck covers politics and government for MPR News. He joined MPR in March 2000. He previously worked in Muncie, Indiana as a reporter for Indiana Public Radio from 1996 to 2000. Scheck graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in broadcast journalism and English. He is an avid runner who has finished five marathons, including two finishes at the Boston Marathon. He loves journalism, baseball and the Philadelphia Eagles.

Tom Scheck Feature Archive

Comforting baby
Some Minnesota legislators, frustrated with their inability to make any headway against law enforcement objections to a medical marijuana bill, are expressing concern that police and prosecutors are spending too much time at the Capitol protecting and serving their own interests. (04/21/2014)
Minnesota is hitting the airwaves in 12 states and two Canadian provinces to try to lure more visitors to Minnesota. (04/17/2014)
Filling a growler
The Teamsters objection to a measure allowing taprooms to sell growlers on Sunday threatens to stall the entire omnibus liquor bill. This would affect the University of Minnesota's ability to sell at its football stadium and taprooms would not be able to open on Sundays at all. (04/11/2014)
After several hours of contentious debate, the Minnesota House today passed a bill to make that the hourly wage by a vote of 71-60. The vote follows one by the Senate on Monday. (04/10/2014)
The bill expands access to affordable health care, expands family leave and provides reasonable accommodations for pregnant and nursing employees. (04/09/2014)
Republicans want to use Wednesday's legislative oversight hearing on the state online insurance marketplace to focus on the problems that plagued the website since it went live in October. Gov. Mark Dayton calls the hearings "a farce. They're making a mockery of the word 'oversight.'" (04/08/2014)
Construction for the building is now expected to begin on July 1, provided the Minnesota Supreme Court dismisses a legal challenge to the building. The building relies on $76 million in taxpayer money and an additional $13 million in parking fees. (04/08/2014)
It's a pattern of behavior his opponents say they've seen repeatedly during his first term as governor. Whether it's a Vikings stadium, business and cigarette taxes, or medical marijuana, some Republicans say Dayton's policy shifts show he's inconsistent and erratic. (04/01/2014)
The allegation was made this week by a supporter of medical marijuana who met privately with Dayton. On Wednesday, Jessica Hauser of Woodbury said the governor suggested she buy marijuana for her son on the street, or in another state. (03/28/2014)
Legislation would require the state provide at least $50,000 for every year a person wrongly served behind bars. A special judicial review panel appointed by the Supreme Court would determine the full amount of money to be awarded. (03/27/2014)
Gov. Mark Dayton said today his proposal to study one type of medical marijuana has been rejected by those who want broader use of the drug. Still, supporters of medical marijuana say they're not giving up. (03/25/2014)
The department is updating its software system to handle changes to the tax code that were made on Friday when Gov. Mark Dayton signed a $443 million tax cut bill into law. (03/24/2014)
Backers say the Women's Economic Security Act, which has quietly made its way through the Legislature, would help ensure that women start earning as much as men. But one Republican lawmaker said the legislation makes women look like a bunch of "whiners," and could cause businesses to cut jobs. (03/19/2014)
"The reality is they haven't agreed and it doesn't appear likely they're about to agree," Gov. Mark Dayton said. "So I need to take this to the people of Minnesota and make it clear to them that they have a big stake in this and that this is unacceptable." (03/19/2014)
Dayton said he's sympathetic with people who say they need medical marijuana to treat certain conditions. But he said as governor he must weigh the potential good of marijuana for some against the harm it could cause others. He suggested the failure to pass a new law would not create a great hardship. (03/13/2014)