Chris Julin

Chris Julin

Reporter
Minnesota Public Radio
cjulin@mpr.org

Chris Julin first showed up at Minnesota Public Radio as an unpaid intern in the Rochester bureau. That was 1983, and he's been in, or near, public radio ever since. He worked as a reporter in St. Paul and Seattle, and many of his stories have appeared on National Public Radio. He's been a news director, a program director, and a disc jockey at small community radio stations in Minneapolis and Grand Rapids, Minnesota. In between, he wrote some freelance articles for print, went to graduate school, taught elementary school and community college, got hired as a social worker, and waited on tables.

Chris Julin Feature Archive

The owls are here. Every few years, owls that usually live in the far north pour into Minnesota during the wintertime. But this year's a record-breaker for the number of owls. (12/13/2004)
There's been lots of talk recently about how to mix politics and religion. So we've been checking in with religious believers around the state to ask how their faith affects their politics. Minnesota Public Radio's Chris Julin made a visit to Chester Park United Methodist Church in Duluth. (12/01/2004)
The guys in Crew Jones are rappers, and they rap about the usual stuff -- going swimming, getting caught in a snowstorm, watching ships on Lake Superior. They're north woods rappers from Duluth. But this is no novelty act. These guys mean business. (11/19/2004)
Aaron Molina is throwing a slumber party this weekend, but it's not for little kids. He's getting a bunch of bands together in Duluth. They're going to start playing Saturday night and they won't stop until breakfast time on Sunday. If you go, bring a pillow. You're supposed to go to sleep during the show. (10/22/2004)
Last week, 30,000 raptors flew past Hawk Ridge in Duluth -- and that was in one day. It was a busy day, but not a record. Last year, 100,000 raptors flew past Hawk Ridge in a single day. We can tell you how many birds flew by because a couple of guys counted them. (09/23/2004)
In Minnesota, all the major dailies are owned by big chains. It's getting harder to find an independently-owned newspaper, but you can still find them in small towns. As part of our series, The Independents, we take a look at a feisty, northwoods newspaper called the Timberjay. (09/20/2004)
Summer's over. The crowds are already thinning in busy tourist spots like Duluth. Up north, it seemed like summer never came this year. Some towns had their chilliest summer on record. Residents in the region have mixed feelings about the changing of the seasons. (09/05/2004)
Derrick Burbul is a high-tech guy. He's a photographer, and he has digital cameras. He does design work on his computer, and he makes DVDs. But he also loves pinhole cameras, and they're about as low-tech as you can get. Lately he's been sending pinhole cameras around the world in the mail and asking people to take pictures for him. The results are on display at the Duluth Art Institute's gallery in the old train depot in Duluth. (08/16/2004)
Some people call Joel Carter the "Rock Doc." He's an emergency room doctor in Duluth, and now he's a sculptor, too. But you won't find any of his works in a gallery. He builds them outside, from stones he finds in the woods. Some people love the rock sculptures. But at least one person doesn't, and Joel Carter thinks he knows who that is. (07/23/2004)
Everyone's talking about marriage -- especially about who can get married. The debate over same-sex marriage is front and center in the U.S. Senate this week. We decided to ask a more basic question -- what is marriage? This is our third in a series of conversations about marriage -- we hear from a group of unmarried people. (07/14/2004)
You might not remember the band QuickBreath -- unless you were growing up in Duluth 30 years ago. They were a big deal back then. They played bars and dances. And they got on the radio -- in Duluth. That was before a few monster companies owned most radio stations. Back then, bands could get their records played on the local rock station. A new CD features some of the local music that got onto the radio during the '70s. (07/09/2004)
People in Duluth had to wait an extra day for fireworks. A fog bank rolled in on the 4th of July and the fireworks were called off. Fog and cool weather are no surprise in Duluth, but this summer has been extra chilly. Tourism officials say it's driving visitors indoors, but not away. (07/05/2004)
You could call it heavy metal music. Some handbells weigh 13 pounds. More than 1,000 handbell ringers are in Duluth for a conference this weekend. The gathering comes to a crescendo on Sunday when hundreds of them perform at one time. (06/24/2004)
These days you can see cattails and water lilies out your window, even if you live nowhere near a lake. Water gardens are all the rage. But some scientists are warning that water gardeners have to be careful or they could endanger native plants. (06/21/2004)
Around the turn of the last century, many white people in the United States were eager to draw a thick, bold line separating the races. Sometimes they drew the line in blood -- by lynching thousands of black people. Most lynchings happened in the Deep South. So it was a shock when the headline, "Duluth Mob Lynches Three Negroes," ran in papers from the Duluth News-Tribune to the New York Times in 1920. June 15 is the anniversary of the lynching. A few years ago, a citizens group began a campaign to build a memorial to the lynching victims in downtown Duluth. Duluth has regained its memory. (06/15/2004)