News & Features Archive

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree
To millions of people, the Christmas tree is a cheerful sight. To scientists who decipher the DNA codes of plants and animals, it's a monster. (12/13/2012)
The percentage of Twin Cities undergraduate freshmen who stay for a second year is at an all-time high, said a University of Minnesota administrator. (12/13/2012)
Car in Cedar Lake
The Hennepin County Sheriff's Office says there was no one in a car that witnesses saw sink in Cedar Lake Thursday. (12/13/2012)
It looks like a torture chamber for cardboard and bubble wrap. At a lab in Chicago, UPS Inc. tests new packaging designs by dropping, shaking and smashing boxes with brutal-looking equipment.
After nearly a year circling the moon, NASA's Ebb and Flow will meet their demise when they crash — on purpose — into the lunar surface.
At least 50 federal lawsuits in nine states that have been filed against New England Compounding Center, and more are being filed in state courts every day. More than 500 people have gotten sick after receiving injections prepared by the pharmacy, including about 370 cases of a rare fungal form of meningitis.
Google Maps has found its way back to the iPhone. The world's most popular online mapping system returned late Wednesday with the release of the Google Maps iPhone application.
The Metropolitan Council has approved more than $10 million in grants to projects along existing and future transit corridors.
There will be no jail time for a St. Paul man whose toddler son was accidentally shot in the head. Instead, a judge ordered Lue Xiong Thursday to educate other parents about firearm safety.
Susan Rice has withdrawn her name from consideration to be the next secretary of state after the embattled U.N. ambassador ran into a standoff with Republicans over an attack on Americans in Libya.
Before coming to St. Paul for an appearance on Wits, W. Kamau Bell spoke with Tom Weber about how he got started in comedy, being a black man on TV and the comparisons that are often drawn between his show Totally Biased and The Daily Show.
We'll look at the battle over filibuster reform. A citizen lobbying group has sued to challenge the current Senate rules, which is used by members of the minority in Congress to kill legislation.
This week on the Friday Roundtable, our panelists will discuss the fiscal cliff negotiations. What does the battle over the fiscal cliff say about the state of our politics, and what will it mean for the nation, and Minnesota, if the issue isn't resolved?
The BBC looks at the city of Philadelphia, where more than 300,000 people since 1971 owe $1.5 billion in unpaid bail, fees and fines related to their run-ins with the court system. Criminal court debt is a growing problem in the United States.
The Spanish-English production by In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theater blends the "no room at the inn" Bible story with current events.
Minneapolis police have arrested a man suspected of sexually assaulting a 33-year-old woman Saturday near Powderhorn Park.
Coverage from WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio, on the elementary school shooting this morning. 27 people are reported to be dead, including 18 children.
Tobacco companies have introduced almost no new cigarettes or smokeless tobacco products in the U.S. in more than 18 months because the federal government has prevented them from doing so, an Associated Press review has found.
Ex-President George H.W. Bush can look forward to spending the holidays at home after nearly three weeks in a Houston hospital with a bronchitis-related cough.
The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is closing the state's smallest wolf hunting and trapping zone effective Friday evening.
Ballet Minnesota's dancers are impressive to watch on stage, but just as impressive is the work of the seamstresses who ensure their costumes are ready for the annual production of Nutcracker.
What would normally be a classic "Colorado Low" with heavy snow will track from near Omaha to Des Moines to La Crosse to Green bay Saturday.
Today on the MPR News Update: Light rail construction is ahead of schedule, the poverty rate in Minnesota is leveling off, our two biggest cities pass budgets and levy increases, and communities in outstate Minnesota look for ways to move forward under changing - and permanent -- demographic and cultural changes.
Beer and wine sales topped $907,000 in their first season at the on-campus University of Minnesota's TCF Bank Stadium.
The world's most popular online mapping system returned late Wednesday with the release of the Google Maps iPhone app.
Jennifer Vogel has been reporting in these cities for a project we're calling "Making Connections" and talks with MPR's Cathy Wurzer about some of her findings.
Egyptians will vote on a new constitution on Saturday after protests of the referendum dominated the last week.
The Cook County sheriff has asked state authorities to investigate Cook County attorney Tim Scannell after a family obtained a restraining order to keep him away from their teenaged daughter. In a statement released by his Minneapolis attorney, Scannell apologized to his northern Minnesota constituents for what he is calling a 'breach of trust.'
In our letters segment this week, a professor mentioned that the Minnesota River Valley is home to 3.6-billion-year-old rocks, some of the oldest rocks on earth. We follow up on why that would be and what they signify about Minnesota's past and future.
The Minneapolis City Council approved the city's 2013 budget Wednesday night after a brief and non-contentious public hearing at City Hall.
Zoo officials said Wednesday they had decided to bring a female polar bear named Berlin to the zoo. She's been living at a St. Paul, Minn., zoo after her home at the Lake Superior Zoo in Duluth flooded this summer.
Voyageurs National Park officials will hold a public meeting in the Twin Cities this weekend to discuss their proposal to launch a campsite reservation system and start charging fees for overnight stays.
St. Paul police are taking extra precautions to make sure Santa delivers gifts to children who will be hospitalized over the holidays.
The son of the late U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone is taking up his own political activism at a state Capitol event calling for upper-income federal tax hikes to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff.
The CEO of a Minneapolis-based bus company will become the next commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Transportation in January. He talked with Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer about his transportation priorities.
Currently, it's legal to buy pop, chips, and cookies using food stamps, as part of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. But increasingly, public health experts concerned about obesity are raising questions about that policy.
The $500 million St. Paul city budget approved Wednesday includes a $1 million to improve the police department's troubled crime lab and $700,000 to hire additional food inspectors.
New information about poverty from the U.S. Census Bureau shows the economic recovery in Minnesota might be ahead of the rest of the nation. While poverty rates in the state have increased significantly since 2007, the most recent Minnesota data show poverty rates have leveled off.
After a brief and non-contentious public hearing, the Minneapolis City Council approved the city's 2013 budget Wednesday evening at City Hall.
U.S. home repossessions rose to a nine-month high in November, even as the number of homes starting on the path to foreclosure declined to the lowest level in six years.
The world's attention wavered between the tragic and the silly in 2012, and along the way, millions of people searched the Web to find out about a royal princess, the latest iPad, and a record-breaking skydiver.
In the emotion-charged realm of adoption, the Internet has been a transformative force, often for good, sometimes for ill.
Water levels on the drought-plagued Mississippi River are expected to keep dropping over the next several weeks, according to a new forecast that comes amid worries that barge traffic soon could be squeezed along a key stretch of the vital shipping corridor.

News & Features Archive

  

Archives

December 2012
S M T W T F S
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

Morning Edition®

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland

Services