Minnesota Public Radio features by Bill Morelock http://minnesota.publicradio.org/about/people/mpr_people_display.php?aut_id=115 en-us Copyright 2014 Minnesota Public Radio Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:35:05 -0500 Minnesota Public Radio features by Bill Morelock http://minnesota.publicradio.org/standard/images/mpr003/logo_mpr.gif http://minnesota.publicradio.org/?refid=0 Of Sea Bird and Surrealism: An Essay by Bill Morelock Erik Satie set the table for the French heavy hitters who came after him. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/11/28/satie-essay?refid=0 Fri, 13 Jun 2014 12:50:00 -0500 Powdered Wigs, Quaint No More - An Essay by Bill Morelock We're used to thinking of the 20th century as the high point of technological and cultural change. The case is easy to make: A generation which knew the horse and buggy watched Neil Armstrong's moon walk. There was Einstein, two world wars, a smallpox vaccine, Elvis Presley and laptop computers. Make your own list. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/01/06/powdered-wigs-quaint-no-more?refid=0 Fri, 07 Mar 2014 11:00:00 -0600 1964: A Child's Christmas on the Willamette Your house is about to flood, and you can take three things. What do you take? Young Bill Morelock took his new vinyl copy of "A Hard Days Night," his baseball glove and trophy for a hole-in-one on a par-3 course. Learn more about his story. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/12/13/1964-a-childs-christmas-on-the-willamette?refid=0 Thu, 19 Dec 2013 23:34:16 -0600 A Hollywood Holiday Join Bill Morelock and Lynne Warfel for an hour of holiday movie music that ranges from the sentimental to the completely cranky. From "White Christmas" and cozy homes for the holidays to Grinches and Scrooges, <i>A Hollywood Holiday</i> takes in your favorite holiday movies from a musical point of view. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/12/11/hollywood-holiday?refid=0 Wed, 11 Dec 2013 11:45:00 -0600 Taste, an Accounting in Three Scenes Bill Morelock digs into the tricky question of taste, approaching it through three different scenes. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/03/18/bill-morelock-taste?refid=0 Mon, 18 Mar 2013 15:30:00 -0500 Gallic Ghost Story The popular notion is that any self-respecting ghost story must pack a nightmarish punch. But Bill Morelock tells a tale of two amusing and inspiring spectres. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/10/25/ghoststory?refid=0 Tue, 30 Oct 2012 16:00:00 -0500 Notes for a Radio Show About the End of the World - An Essay by Bill Morelock In 1965, Walker Percy published an essay called "Notes for a Novel about the End of the World." I wondered if we might not sketch out something similar for a radio show. Again, purely theoretical, but if the notes turn out to be a practical blueprint for an actual broadcast artifact, so be it. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/07/13/notes-for-a-radio-show-about-the-end-of-the-world--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 16 Jul 2012 06:00:00 -0500 Sisyphean Labors - An Essay by Bill Morelock What's wrong with Sisyphus, anyway? Whenever we refer to someone working endlessly to no apparent purpose -- in an office cube, a fast food restaurant, writing a blog -- we invoke Sisyphus. I don't get it. Futility was only one facet of his professional life. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/06/29/sisyphean-labors-an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 02 Jul 2012 06:00:00 -0500 The Epic Battle Between Anxiety and The Well-Turned Tale - An Essay by Bill Morelock In this curious negotiation between us and you about the hows and whens and whys of listening -- digital platforms turning what once was the simple arithmetic of radio into a calculus requiring armies of very smart people to solve -- we don't know what's going to happen next. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/06/15/the-epic-battle-between-anxiety-and-the-wellturned-tale-an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 18 Jun 2012 00:00:00 -0500 How I Landscaped Upon the Stage - An Essay by Bill Morelock I'm not a performer by nature. Given a Briggs-Myers choice between getting up and doing a song and dance in front of a crowd and undergoing a colonoscopy... http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/06/08/how-i-landscaped-upon-the-stage--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 11 Jun 2012 06:00:00 -0500 Trusting the Grump - An Essay by Bill Morelock Paul Fussell was the author of "The Great War and Modern Memory" (1975). It was a compelling, and surprisingly popular study of literary perspectives on the disasters of World War One. Among his trenchant theses, that the war introduced irony as a pervasive mode of thinking which affected the entire culture. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/05/25/trusting-the-grump--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 28 May 2012 06:00:00 -0500 Elegy: May 18th, 1980 - An Essay by Bill Morelock I lived in Pullman, Washington when Mt. St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980. Though 250 miles away, Pullman was in the path of the twelve-hour ash fall that turned day to night on that Sunday 32 years ago. Because it coincided with another significant but small spreading of ashes on that same day, I've tended to recast the event in largely symbolic terms -- in a sense turning the mountain upside down. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/05/18/elegy-may-18th-1980--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Fri, 18 May 2012 11:17:26 -0500 George: An Appreciation - An Essay by Bill Morelock Last week I filled in for Fred Child on Performance Today for a few days. One day the show featured George Gershwin's Concerto in F, played by a Quebecois pianist named Alain Lefevre. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/05/11/george-an-appreciation--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 14 May 2012 00:00:00 -0500 High on Symbolism: Composers' Mania for Pelleas and Melisande Literary movements are, in certain ways, like theoretical physics. They both operate mostly under the radar, undergoing subtle changes, describing rarified events too arcane for the likes of you and me to grasp or care about. But then, every once in awhile, a charismatic personality with a catchy equation (E=mc^2), or a thermonuclear device, demands our attention. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/02/01/celebrating-pelleas-and-melisande-through-four-different-composers?refid=0 Mon, 30 Apr 2012 06:00:00 -0500 Sims Serenade - A [Non-] Essay by Bill Morelock Non-fiction can be as imaginative as fiction, given a strong imagination. But when those sinews fail, when the muscles refuse to twitch on cue, and exuberance parts company with clarity once and for all, what does one do? In baseball, the aging power pitcher re-tools and defends himself with off-speed stuff. Indirect, but effective. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/04/09/sims-serenade?refid=0 Mon, 09 Apr 2012 00:00:00 -0500 A Baseball Hymn - An Essay by Bill Morelock Possibly you've heard all you need to hear about the aesthetics of baseball. And here I am adding innings. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/04/02/a-baseball-hymn--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 02 Apr 2012 06:00:00 -0500 An Immense Purchase - An Essay by Bill Morelock Bill Morelock takes a close look at W.B. Yeats' famed 1919 poem "The Second Coming." http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/03/26/an-immense-purchase--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 26 Mar 2012 06:00:00 -0500 Bach: Placing Timeless Music in Time - Part 2 of an Essay by Bill Morelock For the anniversary of Bach's birth, even as we marvel at the unearthly nature of the music, we might stop and remember that Bach also had to earn a living. Here's how and where he earned a paycheck during the 45 years of his working life. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/03/20/bach-placing-timeless-music-in-time--part-2-of-an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Tue, 20 Mar 2012 06:00:00 -0500 Bach: Placing Timeless Music in Time - Part 1 of an Essay by Bill Morelock For the anniversary of Bach's birth, even as we marvel at the unearthly nature of the music, we might stop and remember that Bach also had to earn a living. Here's how and where he earned a paycheck during the 45 years of his working life. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/03/19/bach-placing-timeless-music-in-time--part-1-of-an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 19 Mar 2012 06:00:00 -0500 Edvard Grieg: absolute quiet and a taste of codfish The quiet that Edvard Grieg needed in order to work is a scarce and, it would seem, non-renewable resource. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/06/14/edvard-grieg-absolute-quiet-and-a-taste-of-codfish?refid=0 Mon, 05 Mar 2012 00:00:00 -0600 A Common Reader - An Essay by Bill Morelock The old professor said "Read not the 'Times,' read the Eternities." Thirty-five years later the dictum is not impossible to follow, just very, very hard. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/02/24/a-common-reader?refid=0 Mon, 27 Feb 2012 06:00:00 -0600 Virgil: The Composer as Writer - An Essay by Bill Morelock Throughout his career, composer Virgil Thomson also wrote about music. And he did so with a freshness and directness we almost marvel at today. No one had, or has, a voice like Thomson's. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/02/17/virgil--the-composer-as-writer--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Tue, 21 Feb 2012 06:00:00 -0600 The Lads in Their Hundreds: the Music of World War I - An Essay by Bill Morelock The popular public television series Downton Abbey has opened a window on the era of the Great War -- today somewhat obscured by time and later conflicts. For many writers, artists and other observers, World War I represented the original 20th century loss of innocence, and still resonates in the culture today. Here's a look at a few composers of the era, and how they responded to the trauma of the Great War. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/02/01/the-lads-in-their-hundreds-the-music-of-world-war-i--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 06 Feb 2012 06:00:00 -0600 Ripe But Not Sweet - An Essay by Bill Morelock There have been countless meditations on the meaning of Shakespeare's "Ripeness is all." It was a Rorschach centuries before Rorschach. Often it suggests a serenity available, though not always secured, late in one's life. Ludwig van Beethoven was defiantly human, a spiny fruit, and stubbornly refused to sweeten as he matured. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/01/27/ripe-but-not-sweet?refid=0 Mon, 30 Jan 2012 10:00:00 -0600 Whimsy Now and Then: "Roll Credits Redux" and Relache - An Essay by Bill Morelock Lynne "I can't believe they're letting us do this again" Warfel and Bill "Who's minding the store anyway?" Morelock return with Roll Credits, their movie music show, Monday night at 7 on Classical MPR. A few notes on the show here, plus a look at a film born at a time when Frivolity forged a movement. Its manifesto: it means nothing. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/01/20/whimsy-now-and-then?refid=0 Mon, 23 Jan 2012 00:00:00 -0600 What's in a Name? - An Essay by Bill Morelock In which the author, never a sure hand with knots, continues a pattern of bungee-jumping above possibly rich and interesting waters. One way or another, we promise a splash. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/01/13/whats-in-a-name--an-essay-by-bill-morelock?refid=0 Mon, 16 Jan 2012 10:00:00 -0600 The Waltz King in the Land of Giants - An Essay by Bill Morelock Johann Strauss, Jr. wrote most of his waltzes for specific parties, conventions and other celebrations. Today he's our traditional go-to guy for a New Year's Day soundtrack. The Strauss brand was Festive, even if its namesake could be a little gloomy. And when he was lured by lucre to a strange, faraway land, Strauss saw menace in every smile. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/01/01/the-waltz-king-in-the-land-of-giants?refid=0 Sun, 01 Jan 2012 00:00:00 -0600 Words and Music: A New Year's Appreciation - An Essay by Bill Morelock In this essay, Bill Morelock muses about his development as a classical host, and the "peculiar" challenges of the job. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/12/23/words-and-music-a-new-years-appreciation?refid=0 Mon, 26 Dec 2011 00:00:00 -0600 Waltz of the Shoulder Turn - An Essay by Bill Morelock This may sound unusual, but there exists a kinship between golf and classical music that deserves exploring. For the benefit of golfers, if not musicians. Bill Morelock explains. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/12/16/waltz-of-the-shoulder-turn?refid=0 Mon, 19 Dec 2011 06:00:00 -0600 Sneers for Fears - An Essay by Bill Morelock Life rushes on, and stops not for an hour, said a 14th century poet. Now chances are you're way too busy confirming the timelessness of medieval wisdom to put on the brakes. But here's something to keep, if rushing ever wrecks you: A retreat from a time-worn treadmill. A tactic for stopping a clock. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/12/09/sneers-for-fears?refid=0 Mon, 12 Dec 2011 00:00:00 -0600 Sipping from the Pierian Spring or, the Anatomy of Humility In this essay, Bill Morelock discusses the source of the saying "A little learning is a dangerous thing," and its meaning. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/12/02/sipping-from-the-pierian-spring?refid=0 Mon, 05 Dec 2011 06:00:00 -0600 Formosa: An Essay by Bill Morelock You're walking through the skyway on your way to an orchestra concert. There at the turn of the corridor a young woman is playing a violin. Her instrument case is open on the floor. She's playing something aching. Bach, maybe, though you're not sure. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/11/18/formosa?refid=0 Mon, 21 Nov 2011 06:00:00 -0600 Short Version - Tour On a bicycle built for pain. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/collections/special/columns/comparing_notes/archive/2011/07/the_short_versi_33.shtml?refid=0 Mon, 11 Jul 2011 00:00:00 -0500 Roll Credits: Mondays at 8 p.m. Tune-in tonight for a new show: Roll Credits, a show about film music with hosts Bill Morelock and Lynne Warfel. Tonight, we'll look into what was in the Hollywood water on the eve of World War II. The single year 1939 gave us Gone With the Wind, Stagecoach, Wuthering Heights, Of Mice and Men, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, and The Wizard of Oz, among others. Steiner, Herrmann, Copland, Tiomkin, Arlen. And that's just the beginning. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/collections/special/columns/comparing_notes/archive/2011/06/roll_credits.shtml?refid=0 Sun, 19 Jun 2011 22:15:14 -0500 The Short Version: Making the Mummy Dance A Polish pianist developed a sense of mission when her keyboard interests turned decidedly old-school. Get the full story in the Short Version. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/collections/special/columns/comparing_notes/archive/2011/06/the_short_versi_31.shtml?refid=0 Wed, 15 Jun 2011 21:39:07 -0500 Coronation Mass by Mozart Easter Sunday from 3-4pm on Classical Minnesota Public Radio, you can hear the Coronation Mass by Mozart. A work, not surprising by the logic of nicknames, first presented on Easter Sunday, 1779. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/04/22/easter-coronation-mass?refid=0 Fri, 22 Apr 2011 12:11:40 -0500 James MacMillan's Seven Last Words If you heard last Friday night's Minnesota Orchestra broadcast on Classical Minnesota Public Radio, or attended the concert at Orchestra Hall, you've already been introduced to James MacMillan's music. Thursday evening you can hear a work from a different era -- and different musical world -- in MacMillan's career. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/04/21/james-macmillans-seven-last-words?refid=0 Thu, 21 Apr 2011 11:23:56 -0500 The Short Version: The Very Model of the Very Model William Schwenck Gilbert was one of the most brilliant lyricists of the musical stage. But even genius sometimes welcomes a little prodding from the headlines. There Gilbert found the kernel for an essential Gilbert & Sullivan character. The Pirates of Penzance wouldn't have been the same without him. /collections/special/columns/comparing_notes/archive/2011/02/the_short_versi_2.shtml?refid=0 Tue, 22 Feb 2011 16:59:47 -0600 Shostakovich: A Complicated Hero This week on Classical MPR, we celebrate Dmitri Shostakovich. He walked the difficult tightrope of keeping the Soviet leadership pleased with his music and produced a catalog of rich, diverse masterpieces in the process. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/01/24/shostakovich-complicated-hero?refid=0 Mon, 24 Jan 2011 10:09:09 -0600 A week of American symphonies It's an all-American week on Classical MPR. Bill Morelock hosts five symphonies each day this week by Aaron Copland, George Chadwick, Charles Ives, William Grant Still and Libby Larsen. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2010/09/11/american_symphonies?refid=0 Sun, 12 Sep 2010 13:00:03 -0500 The SPCO Performs at the new Ordway, January 1985 Archive recording of SPCO's first concert at the brand new Ordway Music Theatre in St. Paul http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2010/01/13/1985_spco?refid=0 Wed, 13 Jan 2010 00:00:00 -0600 Clarinetist Stanley Drucker retires from NY Philharmonic Stanley Drucker joined the New York Philharmonic in 1948 at the age of 19. He's retiring as the orchestra's principal clarinet at the end of the season. Tomorrow night, he will perform his last solo work, a concerto that's just as old as his tenure with the Philharmonic: Aaron Copland's Clarinet Concerto. http://minnesota.publicradio.orghttp://www.mprnews.org/story/2009/06/05/stanley_drucker_retires?refid=0 Fri, 05 Jun 2009 00:00:00 -0500 The Coffee Can Country Club Classical music host Bill Morelock has never seen a prettier golf course than one in Salem, Oregon. He built it himself, at age 11. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/10/10/golf?refid=0 Fri, 13 Oct 2006 15:00:00 -0500 Through many mirrors, dimly: 100 years of Shostakovich Dmitri Shostakovich was born in St. Petersburg, Russia on September 25, 1906. Years after his death, he remains one of the most important figures in 20th-century classical music and one of the most controversial. Under pressure from Soviet authorities, he compromised his art. At least that was how it seemed. http://minnesota.publicradio.orghttp://www.mprnews.org/story/2006/09/25/shostakovich?refid=0 Mon, 25 Sep 2006 14:28:09 -0500 Chamber music marks Shostakovich centenary To mark the centenary of the birth of Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich, classical host Bill Morelock presented a program in Minnesota Public Radio's UBS Forum. Morelock discussed Shostakovich and his compositions with his guests, pianist Alexander Braginsky and cellist Tanya Remenikova. http://minnesota.publicradio.orghttp://www.mprnews.org/story/2006/09/25/shostakovich_ubs_forum?refid=0 Mon, 25 Sep 2006 09:00:00 -0500 Aaron Copland: writing the soundtrack of the American West How did Aaron Copland come to write music to accompany the balletic adventures of cowboys, desperadoes, and pioneer homesteaders? Open Air host Bill Morelock throws a lasso around the memory of this influential American composer. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/11/14_morelockb_copland/?refid=0 Mon, 14 Nov 2005 20:30:00 -0600 Aaron Copland: writing the soundtrack of the American West How did it happen that a young man, son of Russian and Polish Jews, reared on the streets of Brooklyn, New York, nearsighted, who never so much as climbed on a horse or brushed the dust off his chaps... how did Aaron Copland come to write music to accompany the balletic adventures of cowboys and desperadoes and pioneer homesteaders? http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/11/14/aaron-copland-writing-the-soundtrack-of-the-american-west?refid=0 Mon, 14 Nov 2005 00:00:00 -0600 Miracle on 57th Street On Nov. 13, 1943, 25 year-old Leonard Bernstein heard his song cycle &quot;I Hate Music&quot; premiered in New York. A fine title by a young man who, the very next day, would become the most famous musician in America. Open Air host Bill Morelock follows Leonard Bernstein on perhaps the most remarkable day in a remarkable life in music. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/08/30_morelockb_bernstein/?refid=0 Tue, 30 Aug 2005 18:30:00 -0500 Miracle on 57th Street The American novelist Thomas Wolfe said that America is not only the place where miracles happen, but where they happen all the time. This is the story of a miracle, a true-life fairy tale, and appropriately enough it begins with the intervention of the Almighty. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/08/30/miracle-on-57th-street?refid=0 Tue, 30 Aug 2005 00:00:00 -0500 The Waltz King and the Land of Giants When Johann Strauss, Jr. came to America in 1872, concert promoters in Boston went all out. They built a great wooden hall which held an audience of 100,000, not to mention an additional 20,000 singers and musicians. Strauss conducted his own music, communicating with the multitudes through 100 assistant conductors. A sincere expression of our love of Strauss' music (or celebrity?), or a megalomaniacal lust for spectacle? Strauss was pretty sure he knew. Bill Morelock looks at the American sojourn of a reluctant Waltz King. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/08/09_morelockb_strauss/?refid=0 Tue, 09 Aug 2005 18:00:00 -0500 The Waltz King and the Land of Giants When Johann Strauss, Jr. came to America in 1872, concert promoters in Boston went all out. They built a great wooden hall which held an audience of 100,000, not to mention an additional 20,000 singers and musicians. Strauss conducted his own music, communicating with the multitudes through 100 assistant conductors. A sincere expression of our love of Strauss' music (or celebrity?), or a megalomaniacal lust for spectacle? Strauss was pretty sure he knew. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/08/09/the-waltz-king-and-the-land-of-giants?refid=0 Tue, 09 Aug 2005 00:00:00 -0500 Edvard Grieg: absolute quiet and a taste of codfish Classical music host Bill Morelock remembers composer Edvard Grieg on his 162nd birthday. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/06/14_morelockb_grieg/?refid=0 Tue, 14 Jun 2005 18:00:00 -0500 How &quot;Les Six&quot; became the most recognizable brand in French music Classical host Bill Morelock looks at how a proto-marketing campaign in 1917 made infamous the composers Darius Milhaud, Georges Auric, Germaine Tailleferre, Arthur Honegger, Francis Poulenc, and Louis Durey. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/05/28_morelockb_lessix/?refid=0 Sat, 28 May 2005 09:00:00 -0500 Before the Six, there was Satie When French composer Erik Satie wrote the music for &quot;Parade&quot; during World War I, he set in motion the attitude for Paris of the 1920s. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/05/28_morelockb_satie/?refid=0 Sat, 28 May 2005 08:45:00 -0500 How "Les Six" became the most recognizable brand in French music The writer and artistic gadfly Jean Cocteau is most famously credited with having defined and led that group of young French composers known as "Les Six" Darius Milhaud, Georges Auric, Germaine Tailleferre, Arthur Honegger, Francis Poulenc and Louis Durey. However, a less well-known but equally remarkable character was as instrumental in creating the conditions in which The Six presented their music together for the first time, and became the most recognizable "brand" in French music. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/05/28/how-les-six-became-the-most-recognizable-brand-in-french-music?refid=0 Sat, 28 May 2005 00:00:00 -0500 Before the Six, there was Satie Without Satie, the Six (Les Six) might have been four, or seven, or some other number not quantitatively, and certainly not qualitatively, six. Satie, in his impishness and spite, unwittingly invented an attitude. Just as Elvis and Chuck Berry struck the various poses that defined what a rock & roll musician was, Satie introduced the zests and spices, perversities and witticisms, hatreds and loves that characterized the anarchic musical ferment of the nineteen-teens and twenties in Paris. Satie--like an unrepentant patriarch of rock--angered and confused anyone complacent in his or her tastes and too awfully sure of how the world turned. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/05/28/before-the-six-there-was-satie?refid=0 Sat, 28 May 2005 00:00:00 -0500 A mountaintop gone; a life remembered Sydney Fortunato lived, and died, in what may have been the last snippet of time during which the light in a small storefront bookstore on an early autumn evening could still calm the soul. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/05/18_morelockb_mtsthelens/?refid=0 Wed, 18 May 2005 05:00:00 -0500 A mountaintop gone; a life remembered Twenty-five years ago Classical Music host Bill Morelock was a graduate student at Washington State University in Pullman. The day Mt. St. Helens erupted, Pullman was on the southern edge of the fan-shaped progress of the ash cloud as it drifted east. As dramatic as a 12-hour rain of volcanic ash and darkness in mid-afternoon were, the anniversary is always linked with and even overshadowed by a private spreading of ashes that day, and the loss of a friend. What follows is an elegy of sorts. A month after the eruption Morelock fled academia and began working in something called Public Broadcasting, another durable reminder of the day the mountain blew. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/05/18/a-mountaintop-gone-a-life-remembered?refid=0 Wed, 18 May 2005 00:00:00 -0500 Conscience vs. McCarthy: the political Aaron Copland Aaron Copland has been synonymous with American music for more than 60 years. But during the McCarthy era, not even the composer of Lincoln Portrait and Fanfare for the Common Man--two WWII morale boosters--was immune from Sen. Joseph McCarthy's questions about political affiliations in the thirties and forties. Classical musical host Bill Morelock traces the activities of Aaron Copland the composer and Copland the citizen leading up to a cancelled performance and an offical grilling in 1953. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/05/03_morelockb_unamerican/?refid=0 Tue, 03 May 2005 18:31:00 -0500 Conscience vs. McCarthy: the political Aaron Copland Aaron Copland has been synonymous with American music for more than 60 years. But during the McCarthy era, not even the composer of Lincoln Portrait and Fanfare for the Common Man--two WWII morale boosters--was immune from Sen. Joseph McCarthy's questions about political affiliations in the thirties and forties. Classical musical host Bill Morelock traces the activities of Aaron Copland the composer and Copland the citizen leading up to a cancelled performance and an offical grilling in 1953. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/05/03/morelockb-unamerican?refid=0 Tue, 03 May 2005 00:00:00 -0500 The career path of J. S. Bach; from Arnstadt to Leipzig Even geniuses have have not-so-great jobs like the common folk. Open Air host Bill Morelock wonders how J. S. Bach could have created so many well-crafted pieces while he labored long days in undesirable employment. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/04/26_morelockb_bachresume/?refid=0 Tue, 26 Apr 2005 19:00:00 -0500 The career path of J. S. Bach; from Arnstadt to Leipzig Even geniuses have have not-so-great jobs like the common folk. Open Air host Bill Morelock wonders how J. S. Bach could have created so many well-crafted pieces while he labored long days in undesirable employment. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/11/14/morelockb-bachresume?refid=0 Tue, 26 Apr 2005 00:00:00 -0500 The Lads in Their Hundreds: the music of World War I Classical music host Bill Morelock examines the music by French and English composers written during and in the immediate aftermath of The Great War. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/04/05_morelockb_ww1music/?refid=0 Tue, 05 Apr 2005 18:00:00 -0500 The Lads in Their Hundreds: the music of World War I Classical music host Bill Morelock examines the music by French and English composers written during and in the immediate aftermath of The Great War. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2005/04/05/morelockb-ww1music?refid=0 Tue, 05 Apr 2005 00:00:00 -0500 Celebrating &quot;Pelleas and Melisande&quot; through four different composers This month on &quot;Open Air&quot; we'll hear music that an enigmatic, hypnotizing play called &quot;Pelleas and Melisande&quot; coaxed out of four great composers. Classical Music host Bill Morelock examines why Maurice Maeterlinck's symbolist manifesto fascinated composers as varied as Schoenberg, Sibelius, Faure, and Debussy. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2005/01/31_morelockb_pelleas-melisande/?refid=0 Tue, 01 Feb 2005 14:00:00 -0600 Remembering Pearl Harbor and FDR's letter to the future Today is the anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 63 years ago, December 7th, 1941. A little over a week after that tragic event, President Franklin Roosevelt took the time to look past the immediate crisis, and wrote a letter to the future, with every faith there would be a recognizable future. Classical Music host Bill Morelock reads that letter. http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2004/12/07_morelockb_fdrletter/?refid=0 Tue, 07 Dec 2004 15:57:00 -0600