Morning Edition
Morning Edition
Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Jose Antonio VargasAt center of immigration debate, journalist Jose Antonio Vargas wants to 'Define American'
    Immigration reform is likely to be in the national spotlight early next year, as the Obama administration and Congress seek to fix a system that's widely viewed as broken. The people at the center of the debate -- some who have been living and working in the U.S. without legal permission for years -- are increasingly making their voices heard. One is a widely known former journalist who will be speaking in Minneapolis tonight.7:20 a.m.
  • Minneapolis police chiefMore openly gay Minneapolis police officers means a change in culture
    Nearly 20 years after a Minneapolis police sergeant became the first openly gay officer, the city now has its first openly gay police chief. The number of out lesbian and gay police officers in Minneapolis has increased over the years. Some police officials say the increase in numbers and visibility of gay and lesbian officers has changed the culture of the department.8:50 a.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • North Korea Launches Long-Range Rocket
    Defying international warnings, North Korea successfully fired a long-range rocket on Wednesday. The launch was something of a surprise because Pyongyang had indicated technical problems might delay it.
  • Obama Adds Legitimacy To Syrian Rebel Group
    President Obama said the U.S. will recognize a newly formed Syrian opposition group as the country's legitimate representative. That will allow the group to channel international aid money into Syria as well as draw-up plans for a transitional government if the regime of Syrian President Assad falls.
  • Oprah's Book Club Turns Over A New Page
    Oprah Winfrey says her Book Club grew out of a desire to talk to authors after finishing their books. While the original version of the club ended when Winfrey's television show went off the air in 2011, it has now been rebooted online and on the new Oprah Winfrey Network as Book Club 2.0.
  • Ravi Shankar, Who Brought Eastern Music To Western Legends, Dies
    When he was just 10 years old, Shankar began performing in Europe and the US with his family's Indian dance troupe. But at age 18, Shankar gave up all the glitter to study with a guru who taught him the sitar. He became a master, and introduced the West to his country's music.
  • Protests Against Egypt's Constitution Dwindle
    Egypt's protest movement against the controversial draft constitution appears to be losing steam after a lackluster turnout Tuesday night. Opposition leaders had called for mass demonstrations, and they're scrambling to decide whether to boycott Saturday's referendum on the constitution.
  • N.J. Spars Over Free Beach Access Post-Sandy
    Federal taxpayers will pay the lion's share of the restoration for the Jersey shore damage caused by Sandy. But since most of those who will benefit are private landowners on the shore, one N.J. lawmaker wants to prohibit the shore towns from charging access fees to their public beaches.
  • Group Probes Delayed Power Restoration Post Sandy
    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo promised to hold the Long Island Power Authority accountable for its performance after Superstorm Sandy. He appointed a special commission to look at how the utility performed. The commission had a meeting Tuesday night on Long Island, where thousands lost power, in some cases for weeks.
  • Greece To Buy Back Bonds
    Greece's government says it will buy back nearly 32 billion euros of its bonds — that means the country would be erasing nearly $40 billion worth of debt. The country's private-sector creditor agreed to sell off the bonds, though at sharply discounted prices. Getting rid of this chunk of debt should allow Greece to get more money from the International Monetary Fund.
  • Fed Committee Reviews Economy's Health
    Federal Reserve officials were meeting this week to decide how much more credit to pump into the U.S. economy. To find out what they're likely to do — and why — Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.
  • Tax Deductions And The Fiscal Cliff
    Morning Edition continues with the latest installment of its series: The Twelve Days of Deductions. It's a nod to the many deductions, credits and other tax breaks that political leaders are weighing as they continue their negotiations to avoid the "fiscal cliff."

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