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Thursday, October 24, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Hearings On Obamacare Rollout Kick Off On Capitol Hill
    The first of what is likely to be many congressional hearings on the Affordable Care Act rollout happens Thursday. After more than three weeks, consumers trying out the new health care exchanges have complained of delays, inaccurate information and other computer problems. House Republicans are determined to shine a spotlight on the bungles.
  • Therapists Explore Dropping Solo Practices To Join Groups
    In the past, many psychotherapists ran their own little businesses. But changes in health care coverage mean that many must start accepting insurance and doing paperwork. That's leading some therapists to form group practices or join large medical groups — and may lead to better care for patients.
  • eBay Founder Explains His Venture Into Journalism
    Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay, is the latest tech giant to make a bold bet on the future of journalism. Renee Montagne talks with the entrepreneur-philanthropist about his $250 million media venture.
  • Following Bloomberg's Lead, Mexico Aims To Fight Fat
    In the battle against the bulge, lawmakers in Mexico are taking aim at consumers' pocketbooks. They're proposing a series of new taxes on high-calorie food and sodas. Health advocates say the higher prices will get Mexicans to change bad habits, but the beverage industry and small businesses are fighting back.
  • How One D.C. Suburb Set A Gold Standard For Commuting
    A risky, expensive decision by local planners in the 1960s transformed Arlington, Va. — where everyone drove — to a place where people live, walk, bike, eat, play and commute, all without ever getting behind the wheel.
  • Bank Of America Found Liable For Fraud
    A jury in New York found Bank of America liable for fraud Wednesday after a monthlong civil trial. The verdict was considered a win for the Justice Department's prosecution of misdeeds during the financial crisis.
  • 'Blockbusters': Go Big Or Go Home, Says Harvard Professor
    Anita Elberse's new book, Blockbusters, examines the strategy behind making and marketing megahits. She tells NPR's Renee Montagne that content companies — publishers, movie studios and the like — can create blockbusters by dedicating most of their budgets to a select few likely winners.
  • Collector's Rare $10 Bill Could Be Worth $500,000
    Currency collector Billy Baeder owns what might be the most valuable piece of currency printed since 1929. His $10 bill — a 1933 silver certificate — is one of a small batch the government released, then tried to remove from circulation. His bill also has a rare serial number, making it worth an estimated $500,000.
  • U.S. Faces Obstacles To Destroying Syria's Chemical Weapons
    The U.S. is expected to provide equipment to destroy most of Syria's 1,000-ton chemical weapons stockpile, based on a deal negotiated with Russia. But there are plenty of obstacles. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman talks to Renee Montagne about the efforts to destroy Syria's chemical weapons.
  • Indian And Chinese Leaders Sign Border Agreement At Summit
    NPR's correspondents in Shanghai and New Delhi, Frank Langfitt and Julie McCarthy, talk with Steve Inskeep about a recent summit between Indian and Chinese leaders. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang signed an agreement on border cooperation, but had little else of significance to show at the end of their meeting.

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