Morning Edition
Morning Edition
Tuesday, September 4, 2007

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • A swinging good timeMinnesota's tourism season was better than expected
    Minnesota tourism officials feared their business would suffer this year because of high gas prices. But to their surprise, expensive gas didn't hurt, and may have actually helped business.6:50 a.m.
  • No major traffic problems
    No major traffic jams are reported, despite the detours around the collapsed 35W bridge near the University of Minnesota campus. But motorists are still being urged to give themselves extra time if they're heading to the area. Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer talked with MPR's Art Hughes, who was out near the University of Minnesota.7:20 a.m.
  • Crowded hallwaysOne in four Minnesota school districts will ask voters for funding
    School officials say they have no choice, because state funding isn't keeping pace with their rising costs.7:25 a.m.
  • Traffic moving well despite bridge collapse
    No major traffic jams are reported, despite the detours around the collapsed 35W bridge near the University of Minnesota campus. But motorists are still being urged to give themselves extra time if they're heading to the area. Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer talked with Todd Kramascz from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.7:50 a.m.
  • Chris FarrellMonday Markets
    Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer talked with Minnesota Public Radio's chief economics correspondent, Chris Farrell about the latest economic news.7:55 a.m.
  • Schools now required to develop anti-bullying program
    This school year marks the first time districts will have to create a written policy, as mandated by the state Legislature, to prevent the intimidation or bullying of any student. Even before the new law was passed during the last legislative session, the Anoka-Hennepin school district implemented its own anti-bullying program.8:25 a.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Presidential Hopefuls Stump in Early Primary States
    Presidential candidates seize Labor Day of an election year to catch voters while they're at barbecues, picnics and parades. But with states rushing to move up their primaries, Labor Day — 14 months before the vote — has become its own kickoff.
  • Sen. Clinton Campaigns at Iowa Union Rally
    Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) made a Labor Day campaign stop in Iowa with former President Bill Clinton at a Des Moines union rally. She didn't dwell on organized labor though, instead choosing issues important to the middle class: health care, energy policy and the war in Iraq.
  • Nations Jostle for a Share of the Arctic
    Nations and corporations are jostling for a share of the Arctic — a seemingly barren region that everybody wants to own. The climate is changing, and so is the business climate, which you can see when visiting a remote spot north of the Arctic Circle, Bathhurst Inlet.
  • Radio Legend Paul Harvey Turns 89
    Radio personality Paul Harvey celebrates his 89th birthday, and is near the end of a 10-year contract with ABC Radio worth $100 million. With so much money riding on the continued good health of someone of such senior years, many in the radio industry wonder what comes next.
  • Study: Care for Mentally Ill Lacking
    A new study in the medical journal The Lancet shows that no country does a particularly good job caring for those with serious psychiatric illnesses. Still, there are things poor countries can do to help the mentally ill.
  • Mexico's President Calderon Unhappy with U.S.
    Mexican President Felipe Calderon used his State of the Union speech to critique the United States. He said he was protesting what he called the "persecution" of undocumented Mexican workers.
  • Feds Stand Down on Immigration Crackdown
    A new plan to crack down on illegal immigration is on hold. The federal program was supposed to have started this week. It compares employee Social Security numbers with those on file, and cracks down on employers with too many mismatches.
  • Impending Reports to Point to Slowing Economy
    A Bloomberg News poll predicts more jobs were created in August than in July, suggesting that the subprime mortgage crisis isn't dragging down the economy. But analysts maintain that the rising cost of credit is likely to prolong the worst housing recession in 16 years.
  • Ammo Prices Go Up Amid Rumors of Shortage
    Over the past month, newspapers across the country have published stories suggesting that police departments could soon be hit by a nationwide ammunition shortage. Ammunition prices have increased along with copper and other commodities. And that, analysts say, has prompted some gun owners to stockpile ammunition.
  • Scotts Sues Startup over Worm-Dropping Claims
    Fertilizer giant Scotts sues TerraCycle, a small company in New Jersey, for false advertising that sells fertilizers made from worm droppings. Farmers and gardeners have long used worm droppings but now they're sold by mass marketers alongside chemical fertilizers.

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