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Morning Edition
Thursday, April 4, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Risks Increase For Humanitarian Aid Workers In Syria
    David Greene talks to Muhannad Hadi, the World Food Program's regional emergency coordinator for Syria, about the growing humanitarian crisis in Syria. The civil war there has entered its third year, and last month was its deadliest.
  • As Egypt Negotiates IMF Loan, Food And Fuel Prices Soar
    Cairo is negotiating with the International Monetary Fund for a $4.8 billion loan to help pull Egypt out of its deep economic crisis. The government subsidizes wheat and fuel but is running out of money to purchase these crucial imports, and Egyptians are feeling the pinch.
  • Previous Owner Revisits Home Lost To Foreclosure
    Bank foreclosures often force people out of their homes. Some houses re-sell, and new people move in. Five years ago, NPR's Emily Harris bought a house that sold in foreclosure. An evening ring at her doorbell led her to meet the person who had lived there before.
  • Confused In The Kitchen? Share A Photo, Get Some Help
    In our new community cooking series, share your strange and surplus foods with each other — and more importantly: Get and give advice!
  • Study: Record Number Of People Are Cohabitating
    More and more Americans are opting to live together before they get married. That's according to new federal data. And on average, cohabitations last about 22 months compared to 13 months in 1995.
  • A Political War Brews Over 'Food For Peace' Aid Program
    Rumors abound of a major shakeup in the works for U.S. food aid programs. The U.S. would give aid groups money to buy food wherever they could get it cheapest and quickest, rather than shipping abroad commodities bought in the U.S. Already, groups that profit from the current system are mounting a fight.
  • South Africans: Why Were Paratroopers In Central African Republic?
    The deaths of 13 South African soldiers in the mutinous Central African Republic has opposition politicians asking why South African troops were there. The ruling ANC has denied it has any business in the Central African Republic — which is rich in natural resources, including diamonds and uranium.
  • Google Sells Guidebook Brand Back To Frommer
    After buying the company last year, Google decided to stop printing Frommer's travel guides. The founder of the brand now says Google has agreed to sell the company back to him. Arthur Frommer says he will continue to print the travel guides — in addition to publishing them electronically.
  • NBC Has More Problems Than Just 'Tonight Show' Hosts
    NBC announced Wednesday that Jimmy Fallon will take over The Tonight Show from Jay Leno next spring. But NBC has a raft of other problems including a rocky ride in prime time. Plus, it fell from first place last fall to fifth in February — behind not just the other broadcast networks but the Spanish language Univision.
  • Lawyers Join Doctors To Ease Patients' Legal Anxieties
    A compatible medical-legal partnership may sound like an oxymoron. But in hospitals and clinics across the country, doctors are welcoming lawyers into their practices. They say a lawyer may be just the prescription for some patients with intractable legal needs.

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