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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Shipyard Workers Worry About Sequestration Furloughs
    Military communities are keeping a wary eye on the sequester debate in Washington, D.C. In Maine, employees of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard have already been dealing with budget cuts. Now they could face furlough days as well. The smaller payroll could send shock waves through the local economy.
  • Technology Upends Another Industry: Homebuilding
    A Maryland building firm automated its home design process, and now it's looking to use another company to assemble houses on-site from parts. The firm has half as many workers as before the recession.
  • The Hermit Pope Who Set The Precedent For Benedict XVI
    Pope Benedict XVI leaves office this week, the second pope to resign voluntarily. The first was Celestine V, a hermit who quit in 1294, after a brief and disastrous stint. Some scholars say Dante damned Celestine as a coward in his Inferno. Yet his example, legally and spiritually, played a major role in Benedict's departure.
  • EU Agriculture Ministers Address Horse Meat Scandal
    Horse meat has turned up — unlabeled — in food in 14 EU nations. Linda Wertheimer talks to Joshua Chaffin, of the Financial Times, about the ongoing horse meat scandal in Europe. Agriculture ministers have authorized more testing of meat.
  • Supreme Court Considers If Warrantless DNA Swab Violates Constitution
    Twenty-eight states and the federal government have enacted laws that provide for automatic DNA collection from people at the time of their arrest. The question is whether it is unconstitutional to do that without a warrant, for the sole purpose of checking the DNA against a national crime scene database.
  • CBS Adds To New TV Formula With 'Golden Boy'
    CBS has capitalized on its consistently high ratings with shows like CSI and NCIS, but the network is trying out a new formula. It is combining crime-of-the-week stories with longer ongoing story arcs in show like Elementary and Golden Boy, which starts Friday. TV critic Eric Deggans says CBS is trying to keep interest going in the shows so it can capitalize on syndication deals.
  • Bernanke On The Hill, Paper's Name To Change
    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is in front of the Senate Banking Committee Tuesday. And, the International Herald Tribune will be changed to the International New York Times this fall.
  • Has The Nook Saved Barnes & Noble From Going The Way Of Borders?
    In 2009, when Barnes and Noble was focused on competing with Borders, the company held out the arrival of the Nook as a force that would propel them to success. Now Borders is gone but Barnes and Noble is competing with corporate behemoths Apple and Amazon, and the Nook is falling far back in the pack.
  • Manhattan Boasts Valuble Air Rights
    Developers paid more than $40 million for the empty space above Christ Church on Park Avenue at 60th Street. The New York Times reports zoning laws allow for a structure taller than the church to be built on its land, and the church can transfer its unused development rights to an adjoining property . The church's new neighbor is expected to be a 51-story tower, with apartments expected to fetch $8,000 per square foot.
  • Witnesses To Take The Stand In BP Trial
    A federal judge will hear testimony Tuesday in a civil suit over who is to blame and who should be financially liable for the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. On Monday, the court in New Orleans heard more than eight hours of opening statements from lawyers for the government and several defendants.

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