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Morning Edition
Monday, December 3, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Minneapolis retailMinnesotans not paying attention to fiscal cliff
    If Congress and President Obama don't reach a deal to resolve the fiscal cliff before the end of the year, a series of tax hikes and federal spending cuts will kick in on Jan. 1. But many Minnesotans aren't paying much attention to the fiscal cliff.6:19 a.m.
  • Drug-resistant 'superbug' detected in Minn.
    There is growing concern among health care professionals about the spread of so-called superbugs. State Epidemiologist Dr. Ruth Lynfield joins MPR's Cathy Wurzer to talk about the situation.7:43 a.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Egypt's Draft Constitution Divides Nation
    President Mohammed Morsi is facing the biggest rebellion against his rule since assuming power in June. It started with a set of controversial decrees by the president that put him above the law until a constitution is in place. The move has polarized the country and every judge in the country is on strike. Critics say the president is pushing through an illegitimate constitution.
  • More Israeli Settlements Could Scuttle Peace Plan
    After the United Nations voted overwhelmingly to recognize the Palestinians as a non-member state, Israel announced it would expand settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. If completed, the project would effectively divide the West Bank in two, according to the Palestinians.
  • Abad's 'Oblivion' Puts A Face On Colombia's Dead
    One of the rising stars in the Latin American literary world is Hector Abad. The Colombian-born author has released a searing book, Oblivion: A Memoir, in the U.S. that took him a generation to write. It's the story of his father, a beloved doctor who was murdered in the 1980s.
  • Ken Burns Film Examines 1989 Jogger Case
    Ken Burns' new movie in theaters is The Central Park Five. Five black and Latino teenagers admitted to the rape and beating of a white jogger and served prison sentences. But a startling confession in 2002 by a convicted murderer and rapist whose DNA was present at the crime scene led a judge to overturn their convictions.
  • Dubai Meeting Addresses Global Telecommunications
    Representatives from more than 190 countries are convening in Dubai to discuss the treaty regulating global telecommunications. It hasn't been updated since 1988, when the Internet was in its infancy. There is fear that countries known to censor or restrict Internet access will push for global governance that could hamper speech and innovation. Renee Montagne discusses the issues with Ambassador Philip Verveer, who coordinates U.S. policy on global communications.
  • Social Media Help Diabetes Patients (And Drugmakers) Connect
    The number of Americans with diabetes is set to skyrocket in the next 40 years. Social media has given patients an online support network and information repository for dealing with their disease. Big drug companies are hopping on the bandwagon as well.
  • Text Messages Help Smokers Kick The Habit
    Texting may not always be the best method of communication, but it can be a promising support network for smokers who want to quit. Several recent studies show that receiving an encouraging text can help stave off a cigarette craving and boost motivation to quit for good.
  • Singapore Airlines May Sell Stake In Virgin
    Singapore Airlines is looking to sell its large stake in the British carrier Virgin Atlantic, and a U.S. company may be looking to buy it. Delta is reportedly interested, hoping to gain access to Virgin's landing rights at London's Heathrow Airport. Neither Delta nor Virgin has commented on a possible deal.
  • In Eye Control, A Promise To Let Your Tablet Go Hands-Free
    Forget touch screens and voice recognition. What if you could control your computer just by looking at it? Gaze-based interaction has been around for 20 years, but it may be poised to become more widely available — and affordable.
  • Air Umbrella Uses Invisible Air Shield
    Picture an umbrella handle and nothing else, something like a wand, that's the Air Umbrella. That wand apparently keeps you dry by releasing a shield of air. The tech website Mashable says it's still a design concept, but in theory you could adjust the power and size of your invisible air shield depending on how heavily it's raining.

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