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Friday, November 15, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Obama Apologizes, Offers Fix To Insurance Cancellations
    President Obama has acknowledged the fumbled rollout of his signature health care law has hurt his credibility and that of fellow Democrats. He offered a minor change to the law in hopes of calming Democratic nerves, and beating back bigger changes proposed by House Republicans.
  • Health Care Cancellation Cure Could Lead To Higher Premiums
    The health care fix announced by President Obama on Thursday may be good news for some consumers, but it creates a big headache for insurance companies and regulators. An insurance industry trade group warns the last-minute change could destabilize the market and lead to higher premiums.
  • Philippines Disaster Rekindles Fight Over Food Aid Rules
    The Philippine disaster is an example why it increasingly makes sense to buy food close to where its needed rather than ship it across the globe. Most U.S. food aid, though, travels to hotspots from U.S. ports. Critics say that wastes time and money.
  • With Robberies Up, Oakland Residents Turn To Private Cops
    Nervous over a steep spike in armed robberies, several Oakland, Calif., neighborhoods have pooled funds to hire private security patrols. And while some residents feel safer, others worry that there is no one policing the private police force.
  • In France, Some Ask If Racism Is On The Rise
    France is deep in debate, wondering if there's a resurgence of an old colonial racism, or if people have just become more tolerant of bigots. The questions stem from a series of race-based taunts against Justice Minister Christiane Taubira, who is black.
  • Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops
    Day after day, workers at Michigan State University care for and feed colonies of evolving bacteria. The original microbes have produced more than 50,000 generations in the 25 years since the experiment began. Despite predictions the bacteria might someday reach a point where they would evolve no more, the results show they keep changing.
  • A Rancher And A Conservationist Forge An Unlikely Alliance
    Scientists suspect that warming air and rivers, as well as smaller winter snowpack, is endangering western trout. But on a ranch in Montana, methods to protect trout from the effects of cattle ranching are helping the trout become more resilient to the inevitable change in their environment.
  • Lockheed Martin To Close Plants, Lay Off Workers
    Lockheed Martin says it's forced to reduce costs as federal defense spending declines. The nation's largest military contractor announced plans on Thursday to eliminate 4,000 jobs over the next year and a half. It also plans to close plants in several states including California, Pennsylvania and Ohio.
  • Judge: Google's Book Copying Doesn't Violate Copyright Law
    Google has prevailed in a long-running lawsuit over the millions of books the company has digitally scanned without permission from authors and publishers. A U.S. Circuit Court judge has ruled that it's "fair use" when Google scans portions of books for public to use.
  • Game Consoles Marketed As Multimedia Living Room Boxes
    PlayStation 4 is out, and next week, the new Xbox is released. These systems do a whole lot more than just play video games. Microsoft in particular is selling non-gamers on its system's television features. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Christopher Grant, editor-in-chief of the video game website Polygon.

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