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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Fifth congressional district racePanel discussion smooths encounter between Ellison, Fields
    A face-to-face encounter between Democratic Fifth District Rep. Keith Ellison and Republican challenger Chris Fields was a much more subdued event than their previous debate when the candidates verbally attacked each other.7:20 a.m.
  • mandatory reportersWho is required to report suspected child sex abuse?
    In Minnesota, teachers, doctors, and other professionals who have frequent contact with children are required by law to report even suspected child abuse. But there are no state guidelines for training so called "mandated reporters" and the process they use to file a report varies.8:24 a.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Social Conservatives Track Romney's Move To Center
    Mitt Romney appeared to shift his position on contraception in the town hall-style presidential debate last week. And his campaign released an ad, stressing Romney's support for abortion rights under limited circumstances. Social conservatives in Iowa weigh in on whether Romney's shifts on these issues trouble them.
  • What We Say About Our Religion, And What We Do
    A recent Pew survey found that an unprecedented one in five Americans now say they are not affiliated with any religious denomination. Or, looked at another way, nearly four out of five identify with an organized faith. Research also shows those Americans overstate how often they go to church by about half.
  • So Many Screens, And So Little Time To Watch
    While supersized TV screens have a proud place in many American homes, our viewing habits are changing. Even as DVRs and online services alter the meaning of "TV," phones, tablets and game devices crowd pockets and coffee tables, offering new chances to watch video.
  • Apple Unveils Pencil-Thin iPad Mini
    Apple unveiled its iPad Mini on Tuesday. This smaller tablet is set to compete against the Amazon Kindle Fire and Google's Nexus 7. Apple's other product announcements, about notebook and desktop computers, demonstrate the company's technical innovation on many platforms.
  • A Decade Later, Sniper Attacks' Unexpected Lessons
    As we mark the 10th anniversary of the Washington, D.C.-area sniper attacks, a look at what the investigation revealed about racial stereotypes a decade ago.
  • Meningitis From Tainted Drugs Puts Patients, Doctors In Quandary
    Public health officials are trying to strike a balance between alerting, diagnosing and treating patients who might be at risk of fungal infections — and not overdiagnosing and overtreating those who aren't at risk. The caution is warranted. This type of infection can smolder for weeks before exploding into meningitis or causing massive strokes.
  • Tough Times For Girls In Juvenile Justice System
    A new report says that while girls still lag far behind boys in the juvenile courts, the justice system is failing to take into account their physical and emotional needs. Most girls are locked up for crimes such as running away, school absences or even violating curfew — things that aren't even offenses for adults.
  • U.S. Closing In On Saudi Arabia's Oil Production
    The AP reports new drilling methods have boosted U.S. oil production 7 percent this year. And next year, the Energy Department sees American output falling just shy of Saudi Arabia's 11.6 million barrels per day. Industry analysts predict that by 2020, North America could be "the new Middle East."
  • Mobile Ad Sales Help Boost Facebook Earnings
    Facebook beat analysts' expectations, posting solid sales in the third quarter Tuesday. Most important to the company's future, 14 percent of its revenues came from mobile advertising. Chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said he wants to "dispel the myth that Facebook can't make money from mobile." Still, Facebook's mobile partner, game maker Zynga, is in trouble and announced it is laying off 5 percent of its workforce.
  • Resorts Try To Lure Skiers Back After Last Year's Bust
    There's a palpable anxiety in mountain resort towns this fall. After last season's abysmal skiing and snowboarding revenues, these towns are counting on heavy snow this year to make up for the loss. Now, analysts say without early snow, resorts may suffer a "hangover" from last year's disappointment. Luke Runyon reports for Aspen Public Radio.

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