Morning Edition
Morning Edition
Thursday, September 12, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Basement renderingGrand jury testimony today in Terrance Franklin's death
    Franklin died of gunshot wounds after scuffling with police officers in the basement of a Minneapolis home. Two officers were also wounded during the confrontation.6:40 a.m.
  • Michele BachmannBachmann ethics probe: 5 details from the latest document dump
    The U.S. House Ethics Committee announced Wednesday that it's extending its probe into Republican U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann's failed presidential campaign, and has released the full report about Bachmann's campaign compiled by the Office of Congressional Ethics.7:20 a.m.
  • How Totino-Grace discovered, then fired gay veteran teacher
    It's the second high profile departure from Totino-Grace High School in recent months. The school's president resigned this summer after announcing he was in a same-sex relationship. Such incidents are happening across the country as church doctrine collides with changing views on marriage.7:25 a.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • 5 Years After Financial Crisis, Are Big Banks Still A Threat?
    It's been five years since Lehman Brothers collapsed and touched off a banking crisis that is still being felt by the global economy. Today, the banking industry is a lot stronger than it was, but some critics say efforts to reform banking regulations have fallen short of their potential.
  • Long Before Most, Intel Chased The Smart Watch
    Long before smart watches became the latest pursuit for tech companies, Gordon Moore of Intel was experimenting with wristwatch computers. Intel's co-founder and his colleagues built a line of chip-powered watches in the late '70s. The concept was visionary, but the business was a failure. Moore now keeps a memento that he calls his "$15 million watch."
  • Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better
    Cut a tumor from a child's brain and you may save a life. But surgery can hurt the child if healthy brain cells are removed. A Seattle doctor is working on a substance that might help. It binds tightly to cancer cells and makes them glow, so they're easier to distinguish from healthy tissue.
  • Protein In Tarantula Venom Could Be Used As Insecticide
    Scientists in Australia report they have found a way to turn a protein found in the venom of the Australian tarantula into an insecticide. Tests show the protein is particularly effective against the cotton bollworm.
  • Two Years On, Protesters Still Fighting Wisconsin Governor
    In 2011, Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill stripping collective bargaining rights from most public employees, sparking massive protests at the state Capitol. While most demonstrators eventually went away, a small group did not.
  • Russia's Putin Adds Another Voice To Debate On Syria
    Russian President Vladimir Putin has written an op-ed piece for Thursday's New York Times. He's calling on the U.S. to forgo military strikes on Syria. For Russia's view of the Syrian conflict, Renee Montagne talks to Dmitri Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • Backers Of Israel Press For Strikes On Syria
    One of the most powerful lobbies on Capitol Hill is AIPAC, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, which commands bi-partisan respect on Middle East issues. But on the matter of possible military strikes on Syria, AIPAC is having a rare tough go of it.
  • Britain Plans To Privatize Royal Mail
    British officials unveiled plans Thursday morning to sell the majority of its centuries old postal service. It's the largest privatization of a government service the country has seen in decades. The public offering of the world's oldest postal service would take place in the coming weeks.
  • Mexico's Tax Overhaul Has Middle Class Crying Foul
    Mexico's president has unveiled a major shakeup of the country's tax system. His administration says it's aimed at capturing more of Mexico's paltry tax collection. Critics say it's unfairly targeting the middle class. Among the items slated for taxing: dog food and private school tuition.
  • Missouri Tax Posturing May Influence Other States
    State lawmakers failed to override the governor's veto of a controversial measure that would have lowered state income taxes. Although Republicans had supermajorities in the House and Senate, Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon was able to rally school districts, which feared their budgets would suffer from the decline in general revenue.

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