All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, December 2, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Fisher HouseMinneapolis house for military families expanding
    A program that provides families of service members receiving medical treatment a free place to stay is expanding to help more families at the Minneapolis VA hospital.3:49 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergAsk Dr. Hallberg: New vitamin D guidelines
    The Institute of Medicine panel just revised the recommendations for taking vitamin D supplements and calcium. The panel now recommends lower daily doses of both supplements.3:53 p.m.
  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:44 p.m.
  • Folwell HallU of M shuts down campus over holidays to trim costs
    For the first time, the University of Minnesota will shut down its campuses across the state over the winter break. Finding ways to save money during the sleepy holiday schedule is part of the school's effort to trim its more than $3 billion annual budget.4:50 p.m.
  • Clean fieldGenetically modified sugar beet ban threatens Red River Valley farmers
    A court challenge of genetically modified sugar beets could leave farmers without seeds to plant next year.4:54 p.m.
  • Projected budget deficit in Minn. rises to $6.2 billion in 2012-2013
    The incoming Republican House speaker said tax increases are not part of the solution, but the new DFL Senate minority leader said some new revenue is needed to erase the state's projected deficit.5:06 p.m.
  • John GunyouJohn Gunyou on state's projected $6.2 billion shortfall
    To get a bit more perspective on today's budget forecast, which projects a $6.2 billion budget shortfall in the 2012-13 fiscal years, we've called John Gunyou, former state finance commissioner under Republican Gov. Arne Carlson.5:10 p.m.
  • Tony TrimbleFrivolous ballots in the spotlight
    As the hand recount continues in the Minnesota governor's race, the State Canvassing Board plans to meet Friday afternoon to talk about thousands of ballot challenges local officials have determined to be frivolous. The vast majority of the "frivolous" challenges have come from the Republican side.5:25 p.m.
  • Fisher HouseMinneapolis house for military families expanding
    A program that provides families of service members receiving medical treatment a free place to stay is expanding to help more families at the Minneapolis VA hospital.5:50 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergAsk Dr. Hallberg: New vitamin D guidelines
    The Institute of Medicine panel just revised the recommendations for taking vitamin D supplements and calcium. The panel now recommends lower daily doses of both supplements.5:53 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Russia, Qatar To Host 2018, 2022 World Cups
    Two surprise decisions were issued in the world of international soccer on Thursday. The sport's governing body, FIFA, decided the 2022 World Cup will be held in the tiny Persian Gulf country of Qatar. It beat the likes of Australia, Japan and South Korea as well as the U.S. to hold the first international sporting event of this size to take place in the Middle East. And the 2018 decision was another surprise -- Russia will hold that competition, beating such soccer luminaries as England, Spain and the Netherlands.
  • FIFA Faces Growing Corruption Allegations
    FIFA's announcement Thursday was held amid a fair amount of scandal and controversy. NPR's Robert Siegel talks to Stefan Fatsis, our regular sports contributor, about the brewing allegations of an organization steeped in corruption.
  • Hate Crime Statistics Lack Key Facts
    Each year, the FBI releases statistics for hate crimes across the U.S., and they recently issued their report for 2009. What the statistics tell us and just how useful they are is a subject of debate among experts. Some say the data collected isn't always an accurate reflection of the hate crimes committed each year, and that the usefulness of these statistics in preventing future hate crimes is limited.
  • Gates, Mullen: Time To Repeal 'Don't Ask' Is Now
    Defense Secretary Robert Gates and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, testified before a Senate committee on Thursday. The subject: the Pentagon study of "don't ask, don't tell," the law barring gays from serving openly in the military.
  • So Far, Miami Heat Aren't So Hot
    The Miami Heat aren't the dominating team basketball fans expected, at least not yet. They're just two games over .500, and have played poorly against teams with winning records. Cohesiveness has been lacking, and there are also signs of team turmoil and frustration. Star guard Dwyane Wade has been in an early slump, and superstar LeBron James is having some difficulty adjusting to his new environs. Did he intentionally "bump" his head coach in frustration during a loss last weekend?
  • Care At Home: A New Civil Right
    Traditionally, who lives in a nursing home has been seen as a matter of health. But new health reform law and a U.S. Supreme Court decision say people have a right to get their long-term care at home.
  • 3 Ways Of Looking At Government Debt
    With a debt crisis in Europe, and President Obama's debt commission in the news in the U.S., we compare the debt picture in the U.S. and Europe. Short term: Pretty different. Long term: Not so different.
  • How To Write A Hit: Think Like A Teenager (But Keep Parents In Mind)
    Songwriter Makeba Riddick explains the delicate art of writing songs for teens and their parents.
  • Expiration Of Benefits Takes Toll On Unemployed
    With Washington focused on deficit reduction, there's a lot less political support for extending unemployment benefits for Americans who remain out of work. Some people who have lost their benefits say they've changed their outlook on jobs and government aid.
  • Negotiators Seek Tax Deal As House Passes Bill
    In the waning weeks of the Democratic Congress, lawmakers are making their argument about tax rates -- that they should be kept low for most working families, but allowed to rise for top-income earners. But don't let Thursday's show on the House floor distract you from what's really going on. Behind closed doors, negotiators continue to work on a more realistic deal for the post-midterm world -- a deal far more to the liking of newly empowered Republicans.

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