All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • What Will Become Of The Kyoto Climate Treaty?
    The 1997 treaty was supposed to be a first step toward more ambitious actions on climate change. But it's now on the brink of fading into irrelevance as unified, global actions on climate policy have been almost nonexistent.
  • Stern Discusses Possible Outcomes Of Climate Talks
    Guy Raz speaks with Todd Stern, the U.S. special envoy for climate change. He talks about what will — and won't — be accomplished at the U.N. climate talks in Durban, South Africa. Stern predicts no binding agreement to reduce carbon emissions will come out of these talks. He says that's because developing countries such as China and India are not prepared to agree to reductions that would treat developing and developed nations equally. Stern points to the previous round of U.N. talks as having produced an important nonbinding agreement and says all the nations involved are taking that agreement seriously.
  • Cain Reassess His Presidential Campaign
    A day after denying an Atlanta woman's claim that she had shared a 13-year affair with him, Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain said during a morning conference call that he is "reassessing" his candidacy.
  • Gingrich Campaigns In South Carolina
    Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is campaigning this week in South Carolina, which holds its primary on January 21. Gingrich has been surging in the polls recently, though he's drawn attacks from his Republican rivals over remarks on immigration at a debate last week. But many voters in South Carolina are not bothered by Gingirch's position on immigration.
  • Romney Picks Up Key Endorsements In Florida
    Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney campaigned in Florida Tuesday — and picked up a few endorsements from Cuban-American lawmakers.
  • Report Says Syrian Forces Have Killed 256 Children
    According to the report, the Syrian security forces have been involved in torture, sexual violence and other abuses against unarmed protesters.
  • Will International Sanctions Help Syrians?
    A package of tough new economic sanctions imposed this week by the Arab League is another blow to the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. But will international pressure really help the people of Syria? Melissa Block talks with Kimberly Ann Elliott, a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. Elliott co-authored a case study on sanctions against Syria that was published by the Peterson Institute.
  • Hard Times Inspire Ky. College Students To Action
    Berea College's 1,600 students come from low-income households, and sophomore Emily Nugent says they "know about the challenges Americans are facing." Inspired by their own diverse backgrounds, they're taking up causes like standing with the newly poor, helping immigrants or embracing their heritage.
  • India Eye Care Center Finds Middle Way To Capitalism
    Founded in the 1970s in India to eliminate needless blindness, Aravind Eye Care has grown to 4,000 beds in seven hospitals — and its surgeons are among the most efficient in the world. The hospital system conducts 300,000 surgeries a year, and about half are free.
  • American Airlines Files For Bankruptcy
    American Airline's parent company AMR has filed for bankruptcy protection. American will continue to operate its flights as usual. The airline will use bankruptcy to off-load some of the debt that is weighing it down.

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