All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Monday, November 21, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Supercommittee Unlikely To Make Deadline
    Failure of the supercommittee to find the $1.2 trillion in cuts it was charged to identify are expected to trigger automatic budget cuts that start in 2013. Meanwhile, many in Congress assumed the group would include in its bill extensions of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits — both of which will expire at the end of December unless Congress acts to extend them. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks to Robert Siegel with the latest from Capitol Hill.
  • Obama's Hands-Off Approach To The Supercommittee
    After being dragged down by the congressional debate over whether to raise the debt ceiling last summer, the president remained largely silent on the supercommittee. Though the GOP has criticized the president for what they call "failed leadership," it's unclear whether his immediate involvement would have been helpful.
  • After Gadhafi, Libyans Try To Reclaim Their History
    For decades, Moammar Gadhafi repressed and distorted Libyan history, attempting to subsume centuries of civilization under his cult of personality. For Gadhafi, Libyan history began and ended with the Bedouins and the fight against Italian colonization. Now Libyans are emerging from the revolution with a nascent desire to know who they really are. One family in particular is taking the lead in trying to restore to Libyans a sense of national identity, beyond tribal affiliations or geographical location, in hopes of refocusing attention on accepting diversity and getting along.
  • Test Driving The Nissan Leaf
    Robert Siegel test drives the Leaf, Nissan's electric plug-in vehicle, with Carlos Ghosn, chief executive officer of Nissan and Renault.
  • Yo-Yo Ma's Bluegrass-Inspired 'Goat Rodeo'
    The world-renowned cellist's latest Americana exploration features his collaborations with Chris Thile, Edgar Meyer and Stuart Duncan.
  • Hugh Grant Accuses Tabloid Of Hacking His Phone
    Actor Hugh Grant has told a British judge that he was the victim of hacking by a tabloid not owned by Rupert Murdoch. He, in effect, blamed the entire tabloid industry in Britain for invasions of his privacy.
  • At Pop-Up Magazine Shows, No Recordings Allowed
    The live magazine in San Francisco showcases documentary filmmakers, writers, radio producers, photographers and artists. They present their work live onstage — just once — and there is no record it ever happened. Editor Douglas McGray says he likes how it makes audiences' "brains work."
  • Egyptian Protesters Again Converge On Tahrir Square
    Protesters are again piling into Cairo's Tahrir Square after a weekend of violence that left at least two dozen dead and more than a thousand wounded. Just a week ahead of parliamentary elections, the protesters are demanding the fall of the ruling military council.
  • How Do Recent Egypt Protests Impact U.S. Relations?
    Melissa Block speaks with Michele Dunne, director of the Atlantic Council's Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, about U.S. policy toward Egypt in light of the weekend's protests and the upcoming elections. Dunne is a former Middle East specialist for the U.S. State Department.
  • Buying A Savings Bond Is About To Get Harder
    Over the course of the 20th century, everyone from John Wayne to Superman told Americans to buy savings bonds. But these days, fewer and fewer people are buying them. Starting this January, banks will stop selling them.

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