All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Friday, November 12, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • First snowstorm of the season headed our way
    Our first major winter storm of the season is winding up to the south tonight and moving north into Minnesota. From 8-12 inches of heavy snow could fall in a band across parts of central and western Minnesota.3:48 p.m.
  • First snowstorm of the season headed our way
    Our first major winter storm of the season is winding up to the south tonight and moving north into Minnesota. From 8-12 inches of heavy snow could fall in a band across parts of central and western Minnesota.4:45 p.m.
  • Eric W. KalerU of Minn. names presidential finalist: Eric Kaler
    Eric Kaler is currently provost at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York.4:48 p.m.
  • Q & A with U of Minn. finalist Eric Kaler
    The University of Minnesota's choice to become the school's new president is Eric Kaler, currently a provost at Stony Brook University in New York. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1982. Kaler spoke with MPR's Tom Crann.4:52 p.m.
  • Dayton lawyers question Pawlenty holdover status
    The attorneys for Democrat Mark Dayton and Republican Tom Emmer are starting to take center stage in Minnesota's unresolved gubernatorial race.5:20 p.m.
  • Mountain lionDNR: Mountain lion sightings more common, but still rare
    Mountain lions have turned up in increasing numbers in the past two years, but no evidence exists to prove that cougars have become resident in Minnesota, DNR officials say.5:24 p.m.
  • First snowstorm of the season headed our way
    Our first major winter storm of the season is winding up to the south tonight and moving north into Minnesota. From 8-12 inches of heavy snow could fall in a band across parts of central and western Minnesota.5:48 p.m.
  • Huey LewisDinner Party Download with guest Huey Lewis
    The guest of honor on this edition of Dinner Party Download is pop singer Huey Lewis. Rico Gagliano talks to Lewis about his soul roots, his band's original name, and the hard-rock legend from whom he copped his clothes.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Asia Trip, G-20 Summit Reveal Limits Of U.S. Power
    President Obama's trip to Asia for the G-20 summit has underscored the global shift in power. The U.S. was met with criticism and failure on a variety of key issues, which analysts say illustrates Washington's fading clout.
  • Week In Politics: G-20, Deficit Reduction
    Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times, about the G-20 summit and a preliminary proposal from President Obama's deficit commission to cut the nation's debt.
  • Memos To The President
    The Republican Party will take back leadership of the House of Representatives in January. For President Obama, it is a blow — and a challenge. Some of our contributors had advice for him, so they wrote him letters, suggesting what to do next.
  • Kidnapping, Tribal Reprisal Upend Iraqi Woman's Life
    In Diyala province, a young woman is kidnapped and later freed. But in her tribal culture, it may cost her her life. Like countless other women in Iraq, 19-year-old Uhud risks being a victim of an "honor killing" by her shamed family, who suspect she may have been raped.
  • DeMint Increases Clout By Banking On Conservatives
    Conservative Republicans have a new champion: Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina, whose strategy in the midterm elections has given him new clout in the Republican Party. Behind DeMint's ascent is a combination of faith and fundraising.
  • Not So Fast: Future For High-Speed Rail Uncertain
    In wake of the midterm elections, high-speed-rail projects around the country are in jeopardy. Two newly elected governors in the Midwest say they will reject federal funds intended to set up new passenger rail service, while some states like Illinois and California see an opportunity to capture more federal dollars.
  • At Night, Chicago's Science Museum Is Like 'A Cathedral'
    Kate McGroarty is winding up a "month at the museum" -- a stay organizers hope will draw attention to science.
  • Celebrating Niemeyer, Brazil's Modernist Master
    Known as a dreamer who created utopia, architect Oscar Niemeyer took on a project of epic proportions more than 50 year ago: designing the monumental buildings of a new city, Brasilia, the capital of Brazil. At 103, he reflects on his work, past and present.
  • 'Tiny Furniture,' Awfully Big Questions
    In a new comedy based very much on her own life, filmmaker Lena Dunham stars alongside her real-life mother and sister as Aura, a film school graduate who returns, jobless and recently single, to her family's house, hoping to find ambition and direction.
  • Billions For Aid Never Reaches Afghans
    The special inspector general for Afghan reconstruction has found it nearly impossible to account for the almost $18 billion spent from 2007 to 2009, declaring that much of the record-keeping was too poor to analyze. An insider from one USAID program says nearly the entire budget was spent on staff salaries, lavish accommodations and security. Some long-standing aid groups in Kabul denounce the flood of money for what they consider the inevitable corruption that comes with it.

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