All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Arts 101: What do you want to know?
    Have an arts related question you've always wondered about, but have been too embarrassed to ask? Never fear, "Arts 101" is here!3:48 p.m.
  • Bob LarsonAlbert Lea: The manufacturing meltdown
    In Albert Lea, the pain of the manufacturing slump is acute. That sector has lost nearly 43,000 jobs in Minnesota since the start of the recession -- more than any other major industry. With a heavy reliance on factory jobs, Albert Lea's jobless rate topped 11 percent earlier this year.4:50 p.m.
  • Minneapolis Mayor R.T. RybakSupporters say they're ready to back Rybak for governor
    Mayor R.T. Rybak won his third term in Tuesday's election and some speculate he is poised to launch his 2010 campaign, but even though he's been acting like a gubernatorial candidate for several months, he says he's not in a hurry to officially enter the race.5:20 p.m.
  • Petters team tries to turn recordings to advantage
    Attorneys defending Tom Petters in his fraud trial are highlighting recordings made by a government witness, in which company officers appear to wonder how much Petters knows about the scam.5:24 p.m.
  • Kathryn KoobIowa native recalls capture during Iran hostage crisis
    Iowa-native Kathryn Koob worked at the Iran-America Society 30 years ago when militant Islamic students stormed the embassy in Tehran and with support from the Iranian government, 52 Americans were held hostage for 444 days.5:40 p.m.
  • Minn. counties planning vaccinations clinics for kids
    Minnesota counties are ironing out the final details on public vaccination clinics for kids that could begin as early as Nov. 16. The doses will only be available to children aged 9 and under.5:50 p.m.
  • Four more flu deaths reported, school outbreaks wane
    Four more deaths have been linked to the flu in Minnesota, but the number of schools reporting outbreaks dropped considerably in the past week, health officials said Wednesday.5:51 p.m.
  • Puppeteer and puppetPeace puppets get to the heart of theater's mission
    The story of a simple monk trying to promote peace during the Vietnam war might seem an unlikely subject for a puppet show. Yet the performers in "A Path Home" at the In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theater say in many ways their show gets to the very roots of what they do as an organization.5:54 p.m.
  • Bob LarsonAlbert Lea: The manufacturing meltdown
    In Albert Lea, the pain of the manufacturing slump is acute. That sector has lost nearly 43,000 jobs in Minnesota since the start of the recession -- more than any other major industry. With a heavy reliance on factory jobs, Albert Lea's jobless rate topped 11 percent earlier this year.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Italian Judge Convicts Americans In Rendition Case
    An Italian judge convicted 23 Americans in absentia of the kidnapping in 2003 of an Egyptian cleric from Milan. The cleric said he was transferred to an Egyptian jail where he was tortured. The convictions mark the first time "extraordinary rendition" was successfully contested.
  • High Court Weighs Prosecutors' Immunity
    Terry Harrington served 25 years for murder, but he later discovered that prosecutors handling his case worked with the police to withhold evidence that might have freed him. Harrington wants to sue those prosecutors, but must convince the court that the protections prosecutors have from such suits are unconstitutional.
  • Thoughts On A Human Re-Creation Of The Berlin Wall
    Commentator Andrei Codrescu notes that a British artist is asking people to help him mark the 20th anniversary next month of the fall of the Berlin Wall by making a human wall for 15 minutes. At first, Codrescu wants to be part of it, but then has second thoughts.
  • Bloomberg Blames Narrow Win On National Backlash
    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg called his narrow third-term election victory part of a national backlash against incumbents. Pointing to other results across the country, Bloomberg said voters were angry about the economy.
  • Gay-Marriage Advocates Weigh Next Move
    Same-sex marriage supporters are vowing to continue their fight after a loss at the polls in Maine on Tuesday. Voters there passed a measure blocking gay marriage, dealing a major blow to the cause of same-sex marriage around the nation.
  • Iranian Protests Show Opposition Is Still Strong
    Tens of thousands of demonstrators poured into the streets of Tehran again on Wednesday to protest against the government and last June's presidential election. Some analysts had begun to write off the Iranian opposition as a spent force. But Wednesday, it was clear the opposition has not melted away.
  • Smugglers In Iraq Have A New Trade: Corpses
    Stalled for 30 years by invasion, war and rebellions, the flow of corpses from outside Iraq to the Shiite holy cemetery in Najaf has resumed. But plenty of risk remains as traffickers share the country's borders with drug smugglers and other criminals — a price they're willing to pay for the hefty compensation.
  • San Francisco Youth Sanctuary Law Prompts Battle
    San Francisco's Board of Supervisors is overturning a city policy that says undocumented youth accused of felonies must be handed over to federal authorities. The new law requires an actual felony conviction before someone is handed over to federal immigration authorities.
  • Radar Reveals Dynamic World Under Antarctica's Ice
    By flying planes over Antarctica with ice-penetrating radar, lasers and other technology, NASA scientists are able to piece together a picture of the vast mountains, valleys and rivers under the miles of Antarctic ice, revealing a dynamic and complex world. And scientists have already found some really surprising stuff happening inside the ice itself.
  • A Trip To Sumatra To Hear a Gibbon's Call
    The Gibbon, a smaller member of the primate family, is well-known for its long arms and hands. Its speed makes it difficult to see, but its distinctive call is easy to identify. A trip to the rainforests of Indonesia by plane from New York, followed by a crumbling 30-year-old propeller plane, and by foot finally yielded a call from the elusive gibbon.

Program Archive
  
November 2009
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30          
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

The World

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland
Win Your Dinner Party

The Dinner Party Download™

A fast, funny digest of the week's most interesting news, cuisine, cocktails and culture.

Services