All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Monday, September 28, 2009

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Fall colorsVoyageurs: 'It's all remarkable'
    Voyageurs National Park in far northern Minnesota was created in the mid-1970s. It's the only national park in Minnesota. Voyageurs is known for its vast wilderness and stunning beauty, yet many locals say the park doesn't attract enough visitors.4:48 p.m.
  • Empty seatsArchitects another victim of real estate downturn
    The state's architects, victims of the crisis in the real estate industry that you don't hear much about, have seen steeper employment declines than the overall job market. With commercial and residential real estate still suffering, those high-paying architecture jobs may not return anytime soon.5:20 p.m.
  • Fall colorsVoyageurs: 'It's all remarkable'
    Voyageurs National Park in far northern Minnesota was created in the mid-1970s. It's the only national park in Minnesota. Voyageurs is known for its vast wilderness and stunning beauty, yet many locals say the park doesn't attract enough visitors.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Israel Pushes Harder Line On Iran Nuclear Ambitions
    Iran said Monday that it test-launched missiles capable of striking Israeli cities and U.S. military bases in the region. The tests came after the disclosure last week of a second Iranian uranium-enrichment plant. Despite its support for new sanctions against Iran, Israel believes military options may ultimately be needed to halt Iran's nuclear program.
  • U.S. 'Working Closely' With China On Iran, Envoy Says
    Jon Huntsman, the new U.S. ambassador to China, tells NPR he is "working very closely" with China regarding Beijing's response to Iran's expanding nuclear and missile programs. He says the next few days and weeks will be very important. China's support is seen as vital to a coordinated international effort on Iran.
  • FBI Probes Seattle Link To Somali Suicide Bombing
    According to a Somali-language Web site, the FBI is investigating whether a young Somali-American man from Seattle took part in a recent suicide bombing in Mogadishu. The Web site says the man drove one of the two car bombs that killed 21 people on an African Union peacekeepers base.
  • Need An Interpreter? Just Pick Up The Phone
    Hospitals have long been able to pick up the phone and talk to a language interpreter to help them communicate with patients. The use of such over-the-phone interpretation may be spreading. The pharmacy chain Rite Aid plans to offer such services in all of its stores nationwide.
  • Week In Tech Examined
    Omar Gallaga of the Austin American-Statesman discusses the tech news of the week, including AT&T's decision to add multimedia-messaging services to its iPhone, and a classic Carl Sagan documentary auto-tuned to 2009 viral acclaim.
  • Holding On To Health Insurance That Works
    For some Americans, insurance is what it's supposed to be: coverage when you need it. Dave Koenig, 49, has a job with good benefits. Still, he thinks some aspects of the insurance industry should be changed to protect patients from losing coverage.
  • Examining Health Care Coverage Fears
    Karen Pollitz, a research professor at Georgetown University's Health Policy Institute, says as long as those people who obtain health insurance through their workplace remain employed they should feel comfortable about their plan. She adds that there is no requirement that anyone has to change their coverage.
  • An Exhaustive, Invigorating 'Case For God'
    When it comes to our current understanding of theology, former Roman Catholic nun Karen Armstrong attempts to bring "something fresh to the table." Reviewer Susan Jane Gilman calls Armstrong's Case for God a "stimulating, hopeful work."
  • Students At 'Fame' School Nervous About Remake
    The remake of the 1980 film Fame, which opened in theaters this weekend, has its roots in an authentic setting: the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts in New York City. Many students at the school say they are afraid the new version will make LaGuardia students look lightweight.
  • High School DJs Dial Dallas Back To The 1970s
    Although it has a signal that reaches most of Dallas, KEOM-FM broadcasts from Mesquite, Texas, just east of the city. Owned and operated by the Mesquite school district, KEOM exists for the sole purpose of training high school students in the art of radio — through '70s music.

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