All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Main StreetPart 3: Fear and nostalgia in a changing community
    Austin is among hundreds of rural towns around the country where immigrant workers seeking the promise of a better life have altered the community. Latinos now make up nearly a quarter of the city's population. That bothers some longtime Austin residents, who long for the old Austin.4:45 p.m.
  • Dayton and DFLersDFLers unify behind Dayton's campaign for governor
    DFL gubernatorial candidate Mark Dayton stood side by side with a host of party leaders Wednesday afternoon in a show of unity leading into the Nov. 2 general election, a few hours after Margaret Anderson Kelliher conceded the race.5:19 p.m.
  • Payton ThorntonFor those with rare skin disease, U of M treatment gives first-ever relief
    Payton Thornton's can't rub his fingers together without the friction tearing away skin, but new stem cell treatment at the U of M has helped others with his rare condition.5:50 p.m.
  • Felix BushFilm tells of a man who attended his own funeral before dying
    Many of us muse about what people might say about us after we die. A new movie, "Get Low," opening in the Twin Cities this weekend, tells the story of a man who decided to find out.5:54 p.m.
  • Main StreetPart 3: Fear and nostalgia in a changing community
    Austin is among hundreds of rural towns around the country where immigrant workers seeking the promise of a better life have altered the community. Latinos now make up nearly a quarter of the city's population. That bothers some longtime Austin residents, who long for the old Austin.6:16 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Amid Anti-Incumbent Wave, Colorado Senator Wins
    NPR's Melissa Block talks to Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet, who won Tuesday's primary in Colorado. Bennet had the backing of President Obama, and his win may signal that the wave of anti-incumbency may not be as strong as it seemed.
  • For Some Democrats, Clinton Is Campaigner-In-Chief
    Former President Bill Clinton has been busy this summer, raising money and appearing at campaign rallies for Democratic candidates. In some parts of the country, he is proving to be more popular on the campaign trail than President Obama.
  • The Challenges Of Electing Republican Governors
    A record number of governors' seats are up for grabs this year. Two dozen of those seats are open and not contested by an incumbent. NPR's Michele Norris talks to Nick Ayers, executive director of the Republican Governors Association. On Thursday, we'll hear from the Democratic Governors Association.
  • As One Time Capsule Is Buried, Another Disappears
    To mark the school's centennial, Kent State University buried a time capsule on campus this week. The plan is to have students dig up the capsule in 2060. This year, the university was supposed to unearth a time capsule thought to have been buried in 1960, but no one has been able to find it.
  • 'Superclogger': Free Theater On L.A.'s Freeways
    Avenue Q, meet the 405: Artist Joel Kyack's performance piece Superclogger takes to the traffic-snarled roadways of Los Angeles, taking advantage of stopped traffic to explore how we deal with the unexpected.
  • Former House Titan Rostenkowski Was Deal-Maker
    Chicago Democrat Dan Rostenkowski was the gruff, deal-making, steak-devouring embodiment of Congress in the second half of the 20th century. He was convicted in 1996 following a Justice Department investigation into allegations that he misused public funds.
  • Mine Disaster Answers Still Months Away
    Federal mine safety officials urged caution in the wake of conflicting reports about the investigation of the April coal mine disaster in West Virginia that left 29 mineworkers dead. Mine owner Massey Energy has tried to present its own theory about the tragedy.
  • Massive Bridge Project Divides German Winemakers
    Construction of a colossal bridge and highway in the Mosel River Valley -- an area some call Germany's Napa Valley -- is meeting with fierce resistance from some winemakers and locals alike. Some wine producers are turning to their international customers and wine critics to try to stop the project.
  • Letters: JetBlue Flight Attendant Steven Slater
    Listeners wag their fingers at JetBlue after hearing the story of Steven Slater, the fed-up flight attendant who snapped after dealing with an abusive passenger. Slater cursed out the passenger on the plane's PA after landing, then left the plane via emergency chute. He was later arrested. Melissa Block and Michele Norris read from listeners' e-mails.
  • From Grunting To Gabbing: Why Humans Can Talk
    Chimps and humans both have lungs, throats, voice boxes, tongues and lips. But unlike chimps, humans have a vocal tract that allows us to do everything from talk on the phone to sing opera.

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