All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Beach in SomaliaA safer Mogadishu beckons Somali-Americans
    Once regarded as one of the world's most dangerous cities, the Somali capital of Mogadishu is seeing a bit of a revival. Increased security has helped lure some young Somali-Americans to the city of their birth for the first time since civil war erupted 21 years ago. But the peace is fragile.3:49 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergDr. Jon Hallberg: When to be concerned about a fever
    At what point should a person seek treatment for a fever?3:54 p.m.
  • Painting her back braceBridge survivor on 5th anniversary: 'The day I got to live'
    Tomorrow marks the fifth anniversary of the I-35W bridge collapse in downtown Minneapolis. On August 1, 2007, 13 people died and 145 others were injured when one of Minnesota's busiest bridges suddenly fell into the Mississippi River. MPR's Tom Crann checks in with one of the survivors of the collapse, Lindsey Petterson Walz. Even five years later, she says the events of that day still affect her in many ways.4:49 p.m.
  • Mark RitchieSupreme Court weighs authority to title proposed amendments
    The Minnesota Supreme Court heard arguments today in a lawsuit that accuses Secretary of State Mark Ritchie of overstepping his authority by rewording the titles of two proposed constitutional amendments.5:20 p.m.
  • Aerial viewCourt rulings on I-35W bridge rattle builders
    After the Interstate 35W bridge collapsed, Minnesota lawmakers had no doubt that as the owner of the bridge the state would be at the center of a legal dispute.5:24 p.m.
  • Beach in SomaliaA safer Mogadishu beckons Somali-Americans
    Once regarded as one of the world's most dangerous cities, the Somali capital of Mogadishu is seeing a bit of a revival. Increased security has helped lure some young Somali-Americans to the city of their birth for the first time since civil war erupted 21 years ago. But the peace is fragile.5:51 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergDr. Jon Hallberg: When to be concerned about a fever
    At what point should a person seek treatment for a fever?5:55 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Political Stumbles Mark Romney's Trip Abroad
    Mitt Romney headed home on Tuesday after an overseas trip to three countries. The presumptive Republican nominee visited Poland, where he delivered a speech in Warsaw. He also visited the United Kingdom and Israel.
  • Romney Campaign Stokes VP Tension With New App
    The biggest mystery currently looming over the political world is who Mitt Romney will pick as his running mate. The campaign has actively built suspense over the announcement — offering supporters a chance to meet the eventual pick and tweeting out the names of some contenders believed to be on a shortlist. On Tuesday, the campaign released a smartphone app called "Mitt's VP" and promised that those who download it will be the first to know who Romney chooses. Audie Cornish has more.
  • Teens Petition For A Woman To Moderate Fall Debate
    Audie Cornish speaks with a high school student who gathered almost 120,000 signatures on a petition she created with two civics classmates. Emma Axelrod of Montclair, N.J., and her friends are asking the Commission on Presidential Debates to select a woman to moderate at least one of this fall's presidential debates. The young women point out in their petition that it's been 20 years since a female moderator has run a presidential debate. They tried to deliver that petition to the Commission in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.
  • We've Got Olympic Spirit, Yes We Do; How 'Bout You?
    The London Games have conspicuously defied traditional notions by having cheerleaders, in a few different styles, at a few different venues. In basketball, dance teams perform between matches. In beach volleyball, highly choreographed teams delight attendees.
  • Newspaper Takes A Stand On Anonymous Commenters
    The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Wash., found itself in court when it tried to protect the anonymity of a reader who posted a snarky, and possibly defamatory, comment. The paper says it had an obligation to protect her identity, but there's growing pressure on news sites to reconsider the practice of allowing anonymous comments.
  • Grotesque Horror Through A Kid-Sized Window
    Stephen King's It showed Erin Morgenstern that the demons and ghouls of childhood stories don't hit the road just because you grow up. Have you read something that both scared and enticed you? Tell us about it in the comments.
  • Does New York City Need More Taxis?
    The City of New York wants to add 2,000 more taxi cabs onto Manhattan's streets. That would make it easier to hail a cab, but it might make it harder to get where you're going.
  • Sound Of Your City: Trains
    The NPR Cities Project has been asking listeners to tell us about the heart of their city. In this edition, we hear sounds of transit from across the country. You can see the submissions and contribute your own photos here.
  • U.S. Wages Sisyphean War Against Afghan Corruption
    The U.S. has cited corruption as a major issue in Afghanistan for years. Yet as the U.S. military effort has begun to wind down, the Americans have made little progress in combating an endemic problem.
  • 'The Lies Are Over': A Journalist Unravels
    Science writer Jonah Lehrer has resigned his post at The New Yorker after another reporter revealed he'd made up some of the Bob Dylan quotes in his latest book. NPR's Neda Ulaby looks at how the fake quotes were discovered and why Lehrer became a star at such a young age.

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