All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, July 14, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • How schools will be affected by aid payment shift
    The budget agreement reached Thursday makes some fundamental changes in the way the state funds public schools. Gov. Mark Dayton had already proposed delaying 30 percent of school payments as part of the budget he presented in February. Here's more information on how that shift will affect school districts.3:54 p.m.
  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:44 p.m.
  • What are tobacco bonds?
    Gov. Mark Dayton's proposal to end the state shutdown and reach a new two-year budget deal includes $700 million in revenue from the sale of "tobacco bonds." That's left many people wondering what the bonds are and how the proposal would work.4:50 p.m.
  • Tornado damageCensus data paints a picture of disparity in tornado zone
    New census data out today illuminates with detail the housing picture in the north Minneapolis tornado zone, showing the challenges facing that area of the city as it struggles to recover from the May 22 tornado.4:54 p.m.
  • Dayton and GOP leadersDayton, GOP reach budget deal; shutdown to end soon
    DFL Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican legislative leaders say they've reached a budget compromise to end the state government shutdown.5:08 p.m.
  • How schools will be affected by aid payment shift
    The budget agreement reached Thursday makes some fundamental changes in the way the state funds public schools. Gov. Mark Dayton had already proposed delaying 30 percent of school payments as part of the budget he presented in February. Here's more information on how that shift will affect school districts.5:40 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S., Allies Optimistic Gadhafi's 'Days Are Numbered'
    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is preparing to meet with other top diplomats in Istanbul, Turkey, to discuss Libya. And while many believe Gadhafi is looking for a way out, others following the situation are not so sure, saying they've heard similar reports before.
  • Pentagon Unveils Plan To Defend Against Cyberattack
    The Pentagon unveiled its strategy Thursday for defending against cyberattack, officially classifying cyberspace as a war-fighting domain along with air, sea and space. Robert Siegel talks with NPR's Tom Gjelten about the new strategy.
  • VA Loans Make Many Foreclosed Homes Off-Limits
    Veterans Affairs loans offer good deals to vets, but they come with strings attached: strict provisions that can make it hard to buy foreclosed properties. Now many vets complain that the rules prevent them from bidding on the best deals.
  • Business Group To Capitol Hill: Don't Risk Default
    More than 450 business leaders sent a letter to President Obama and Congress this week urging them to reach a deal on raising the debt ceiling. Robert Siegel speaks with Jay Washburn, the owner and CEO of a small business in Boise, Idaho — the Dixon Container Co. — about why he signed the letter.
  • Innovative Ideas To Keep Cool, Save Energy
    With much of the U.S. going through a heat wave and the report that the U.S. military spends $20 billion a year on air conditioning in Iraq and Afghanistan, we wondered just what's being done to make air conditioning more energy- and cost-efficient. Michele Norris asks Lloyd Alter, a senior writer for architecture and design for the web site, Treehugger.
  • U.S. Quietly Halts Scholarship For Afghan Students
    The program sent Afghan students to U.S. high schools for a year, but many fled to Canada seeking asylum and fearing a dark future in Afghanistan. One student who left Texas for Toronto said his family received threats for sending their son to the West and thought he'd be in danger if he returned.
  • Pakistan Tries To Allay Fears About Nuke Safety
    Amid international concerns that terrorists might seize Pakistan's nuclear materials, and amid Pakistani concerns that the U.S. might seize them, Islamabad has issued a strong statement declaring that the weapons are safe.
  • The Man Behind The GOP's No-Tax Pledge
    One person with outsized influence in the debt-ceiling debate is not at the negotiating table. Anti-tax advocate Grover Norquist wants to hold Republicans to their pledge not to raise taxes — even if he leaves a little gridlock in his wake.
  • Can Wizards And Vampires Collect Unemployment?
    As the Harry Potter and Twilight franchises come to an end, the wizards, vampires and werewolves that have become household names will find themselves looking for work. But finding employment as a marquee fantasy actor is tougher than it may seem.
  • What Book Will Fill Harry Potter Gap?
    The release of the last Harry Potter movie marks an end to a saga more than 10 years in the making. The first J.K. Rowling book was published in 1997. But the question of what young adult series will fill that void remains to be seen. Michele Norris talks to Judy Bulow, a book buyer at Tattered Cover Books in Denver, about what comes after the adventure of the boy wizard comes to an end.

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