All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Shutdown would halt construction projects, strand workers
    A government shutdown would also suspend electrical inspections required by law for nearly all construction projects, effectively slowing building projects to a halt and potentially stranding workers.3:20 p.m.
  • FAQ on Minnesota's state government shutdown
    Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about the state government shutdown in Minnesota.3:50 p.m.
  • Crow Wing State ParkAs shutdown nears, state park cancellations mount
    Employees are preparing state parks for closure, and small tourism community boosters say they'll lose millions because of canceled vacation plans.4:15 p.m.
  • Barry and KlingThree key moments define Bill Kling's legacy in public radio
    After more than four decades as president of Minnesota Public Radio, Bill Kling steps down at the end of this week. Over the years he's been hailed as a visionary and a maverick. He's shaped many major developments in public broadcasting that go beyond Minnesota Public Radio. Three pivotal moments in Bill Kling's career helped shape the entire public radio system in the United States.4:45 p.m.
  • Dayton, GOP leadersWho is to blame if govt. shuts down? Lawmakers stay mum
    Legislators are saying little about their closed-door meeting and negotiations, so who takes the political blame if government shuts down?4:54 p.m.
  • Rest stop closedShutdown picture becomes clearer; budget solution remains elusive
    The consequences of a Minnesota state government shutdown became clearer on Wednesday, when a court decided only "critical core functions" would continue. But the budget solution that would prevent it remained elusive.5:15 p.m.
  • Child care shutdownFamilies, child care services lose out in judge's ruling
    Today's ruling by a judge on essential services is a tough blow for families, and could have far-reaching effects across Minnesota.5:20 p.m.
  • Nonprofit groups not considered 'essential'
    Ramsey County Judge Kathleen Gearin ruled Wednesday that while some of the state's nonprofit organizations provide services that vulnerable Minnesotans rely on, it's not a critical core function of the government to continue funding them in the event of a shutdown. MPR's Tom Crann spoke with Jon Pratt, executive director of the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, about how the ruling will impact those groups.5:24 p.m.
  • Shutdown would halt construction projects, strand workers
    A government shutdown would also suspend electrical inspections required by law for nearly all construction projects, effectively slowing building projects to a halt and potentially stranding workers.5:50 p.m.
  • Crow Wing State ParkAs shutdown nears, state park cancellations mount
    Employees are preparing state parks for closure, and small tourism community boosters say they'll lose millions because of canceled vacation plans.5:54 p.m.
  • FAQ on Minnesota's state government shutdown
    Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about the state government shutdown in Minnesota.6:20 p.m.
  • Cube CriticsCube Critics: Robots at the movies
    The resident film fanatics of Minnesota Public Radio News, Stephanie Curtis the Movie Maven, and her cubicle neighbor Euan Kerr, can always find something to talk about. Today, it's a particularly "robotic" summer blockbuster on Cube Critics.6:25 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Obama Challenges GOP Lawmakers In Budget Debate
    President Obama took questions from reporters Wednesday at his first news conference since March. He called out congressional Republicans for their refusal to consider any revenue increases as part of a budget deal. Mister Obama also took questions regarding his views on same-sex marriage.
  • Congress Reacts To Obama's Presser
    President Obama tells Congress to get cracking on the deficit reduction talks — and maybe not take so many vacations. After all, Mister Obama said, his kids do their homework ahead of time, so why can't Congress?
  • Bank Of America Settles With Investors
    Bank of America will pay $8.5 billion to settle claims by investors who lost money on mortgage-backed securities. The securities at issue were put together and sold by Countrywide, and they became Bank of America's problem when the bank acquired the mortgage giant in 2008.
  • White House Pushes For Higher Fuel Efficiency
    The Obama administration and auto industry executives are starting talks over new fuel economy standards for cars and trucks, which are to be announced in September. Sources say the administration is pushing for the average fuel economy for each carmaker's fleet to rise to 56 mpg by 2025. The companies want something closer to 47 mpg. The heavyweight in these negotiations could turn out to be California, which plans to set its own standard if the federal government doesn't go high enough.
  • Marijuana Plants Discovered At National Forest
    In the green idyll of Wallowa-Whitman National Forest in Oregon, more than 90,000 marijuana plants were discovered earlier this month. Park officials now have to cope with the cleanup of the site — and the toxicity caused by an extensive camp of pot farmers and the fertilizers they used. Melissa Block speaks with park ranger Ken Gebhardt about the job ahead.
  • Drug Given To Moms After Childbirth Sparks Controversy
    The leading cause of maternal death in the developing world is excessive bleeding after childbirth. The drug misoprostol can prevent the bleeding — but it can also be used to induce abortion. So it carries both a promise and a risk, especially in places like Mozambique.
  • How Rare Is A Sports Franchise Bankruptcy?
    Robert Siegel talks with bankruptcy lawyer Charles Tatelbaum, a partner at Hinshaw and Culbertson and former vice president of research at the American Bankruptcy Institute. They discuss the Los Angeles Dodgers bankruptcy filing — and what is at stake for a franchise that files for Chapter 11 during the season.
  • Letters: Butter Sculptor; Child Abuse Investigation
    Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.
  • At 75, 'Gone With The Wind' Marks Yet 'Another Day'
    As a little girl, novelist Margaret Mitchell sat on the front porch of her Georgia home, listening to adults tell stories of the Civil War. Mitchell's famous novel of the Old South was published 75 years ago this month; NPR's Kathy Lohr visits "the closest thing to Tara," just south of Atlanta.
  • Greek Parliament Approves Austerity Package
    The action triggered large-scale street protests, but it paves the way for the country to get bailout loans that will prevent an imminent default on its obligations.

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