All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Budget demonstratorsDayton outlines services he wants protected in shutdown
    The governor filed a petition today outlining the government functions that he views as essential, including prisons, emergency highway repair and programs for the poor, elderly and disabled.4:20 p.m.
  • Mashed potatoes on a stickTalking about Minnesota food with James Norton
    As a new feature on All Things Considered, we're going to look at the food and trends of Minnesota — and not just the Twin Cities — with someone food writer and blogger James Norton.4:44 p.m.
  • Rep. Michele BachmannIn Bachmann's district, a mixed response to presidential bid
    This week, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., announced a formal bid for the White House. The conservative Republican remains popular in her district and her constituents are reacting to her decision to run for president.5:20 p.m.
  • Budget demonstratorsDayton outlines services he wants protected in shutdown
    The governor filed a petition today outlining the government functions that he views as essential, including prisons, emergency highway repair and programs for the poor, elderly and disabled.5:50 p.m.
  • Cube CriticsThe Cube Critics go green
    This week on Cube Critics, Euan Kerr and Stephanie Curtis ponder whether people really realize (or care) that "The Green Hornet" and "The Green Lantern" (which opens this week) are different films.6:25 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Calif. Legislature Races To Meet Deadline
    California's budget deadline is Wednesday, and legislators are scrambling to come up with spending cuts and tax compromises. A measure passed by voters last year means that if lawmakers don't meet Wednesday's deadline, they'll go unpaid until they pass a budget. And they won't get back pay.
  • 2 Million 'Open Jobs'? Yes, But U.S. Has A Skills Mismatch
    The manufacturers and others with jobs to fill need workers with strong, basic skills. And that may require steering more young people into vocations and giving up the idea that everyone should have the chance to go to college.
  • White House Responds To Criticism About Libya
    In a report to Congress, the Obama administration Wednesday made the case that U.S. involvement in the current NATO action in Libya does not invoke the war power. NPR's Scott Horsley talks to Melissa Block.
  • Channel 101 Contest Eases Amateurs Into Hollywood
    Once a month, DIY media makers gather in Los Angeles to watch each other's TV minishows, then vote for the best. The underground event is called Channel 101 and the goal is to win enough audience votes to be invited back for another screening.
  • Decoding The Melee Of The 'Spin Room'
    Republican presidential candidates met in New Hampshire to debate this week. Afterward, they engaged in the classic American tradition of spin.
  • Pakistan Reportedly Arrests Suspected CIA Informants
    Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Rachel Martin about the arrest of five suspected informants by Pakistan — on accusations they helped the CIA monitor Osama bin Laden's hideaway in the weeks before he was shot dead in a U.S. raid.
  • A Fight To Keep Northern Ireland Interviews Secret
    Boston College scholars interviewed paramilitary fighters on both sides of a violent, decades-long conflict in Northern Ireland. Now, the British government wants access to those confidential interviews. The case worries historians who fear it may make people more reluctant to share their stories.
  • The Academy Changes 'Best Picture' Rules
    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences received some backlash when it announced the expansion of the "best picture" category to 10 films for the 82nd Academy Awards. Critics questioned whether a "best picture" nomination would lose its meaning with so many films in the category. Now, the Academy is modifying the rules again — anywhere from five to 10 films could now be nominated. Melissa Block speaks with Steven Zeitchik, film writer for The Los Angeles Times, about the decision.
  • South Sudan Works To Aid Wildlife That Survived War
    Two decades of civil war wiped out much of South Sudan's wildlife — but not all of it. Surprisingly, large herds of antelope and elephant remain. Now conservationists are tracking animals across the lush landscape to try to save them from poachers and the impact of development.
  • Syrian Refugee In Turkey: 'We Had To Run'
    As Syrian troops continue their crackdown on dissent, nearly 8,500 Syrians have sought refuge in Turkey. The stories the refugees tell reflect decades of suffering by those who dared oppose former President Hafez al-Assad and his son Bashar.

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