All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • In Syria, A Tense Election Day With Winner Little In Doubt
    Syrians are voting in the country's presidential election, even as a civil war continues to rage around them. Sam Dagher of The Wall Street Journal is in Syria, and he discusses the disputed election.
  • As Polls Close, Many Syrians Fear The Days To Come
    Some Syrians fear that after the elections, President Bashar Assad's regime will get worse. They suspect that truces will evaporate, arrests will increase and more of the country will be partitioned.
  • Gun Shots Interrupt Interview, But The Conversation Just Gets Started
    During a conversation between a reporter and community activists on Chicago's South Side, gunshots not more than 100 feet away shattered an otherwise quiet afternoon. After the initial shock wore off, the neighborhood leaders expressed their frustration over their community's connection with gun violence and engaged in a deep conversation about its underlying causes — and what can be done to solve them.
  • From Lunch (n.) To Balding (adj.), Some Words Are Just 'Bad English'
    A new book looks at words that self-appointed linguistic police have declared contraband, like "lunch," which should be a verb, and "balding," a participle formed from an adjective instead of a verb.
  • In Warsaw, Obama Vows To Keep Rattled Allies Out Of Russian Orbit
    President Obama is starting a European trip in Poland, where he will meet allied leaders from central and eastern Europe. They are worried about Russia's intentions after the recent events in Ukraine.
  • Russia Takes Helm Of UN Security Council, Turns Focus On Ukraine
    In June, Russia serves as the president of the United Nations Security Council. Already, that has meant a focus on Ukraine. Russia wants the Ukrainian government to end its military crackdown on separatists. It has also called for consultations on the humanitarian situation in the country.
  • June 4: The Day That Defines, And Still Haunts China
    Suppressing its own people with tanks and guns 25 years ago was a pivotal act of modern China. Beijing hoped economic prosperity would make people forget. But the legacy of Tiananmen remains potent.
  • Book Review: 'The Director' and 'Night Heron'
    Alan Cheuse reviews two new spy novels: David Igantius' The Director and Adam Brookes' Night Heron.
  • In 'Night Moves,' Filmmaker Dredges The Tension That Lives In Quiet
    Director Kelly Reichardt lets her films live in the spaces of words unsaid. Her latest movie, Night Moves, is no different different; it's sparse and deliberately paced. She speaks about her work.
  • Former Taliban Ministers Leave Guantanamo, Trailed By Questions
    A debate has arisen recently over the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl: Did the U.S. negotiate with terrorists to win his release, or was this the kind of commonplace prisoner swap that comes in the final months of a war? The five men released in exchange for Bergdahl's safe return weren't common fighters; they were members of the Taliban government. And the arrangements of their release could offer a template for how to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay.

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