All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Pro bono lawyerMark Lee advocates for asylum seekers: Minnesota Sounds and Voices
    Hundreds of people who live in Minnesota are here because they fear persecution, even death, in their home countries, says Mark Lee, a lawyer who helps refugees win asylum in the United States. "They're beaten and abused in ways that is hard to imagine."3:49 p.m.
  • Benjamin PercyAuthor Benjamin Percy takes werewolves seriously
    As a grade-schooler, Benjamin Percy was so interested in werewolves he conducted a project on lycanthropy by trying to transform one night in his back yard. As the St. Olaf College writer-in-residence, Percy's obsession led him to write "Red Moon," a novel that channels researched themes of applied genetics, human rights, and terrorism to create a thrill ride of a story about family, conflict, and politics.3:53 p.m.
  • Sandy SpielerArt Heroes: Sandy Spieler's optimism shines with In the Heart of the Beast
    Sandy Spieler has used her artistic skills to help pull together a diverse neighborhood in south Minneapolis, raise awareness of pressing environmental issues and celebrate the human capacity to do good in the world, through In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theater.4:49 p.m.
  • Trotting wolfGroups opposed to Minn. wolf hunt lose in court
    Groups challenging Minnesota rules for a wolf hunting and trapping season in the state were dealt another blow Wednesday in their effort to stop the practices.5:20 p.m.
  • Sara Jane OlsonVideo: Ex-radical Sara Jane Olson takes on new cause
    Since Sara Jane Olson was released from a California prison four years ago, she's lived a relatively private life in her St. Paul neighborhood. Olson served seven years in prison for her involvement with the Symbionese Liberation Army in the 1970s -- a radical group best known for kidnapping Patty Hearst. Now she's moving back into public life by petitioning the White House to reduce disparities in prison sentences for crack and powder cocaine.5:23 p.m.
  • Pro bono lawyerMark Lee advocates for asylum seekers: Minnesota Sounds and Voices
    Hundreds of people who live in Minnesota are here because they fear persecution, even death, in their home countries, says Mark Lee, a lawyer who helps refugees win asylum in the United States. "They're beaten and abused in ways that is hard to imagine."5:51 p.m.
  • Benjamin PercyAuthor Benjamin Percy takes werewolves seriously
    As a grade-schooler, Benjamin Percy was so interested in werewolves he conducted a project on lycanthropy by trying to transform one night in his back yard. As the St. Olaf College writer-in-residence, Percy's obsession led him to write "Red Moon," a novel that channels researched themes of applied genetics, human rights, and terrorism to create a thrill ride of a story about family, conflict, and politics.6:19 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Woolwich Murder Suspect May Have Ties To Islamist Groups
    The British government is setting up a new terrorism task force following last week's brutal killing of a soldier by men wielding cleavers and knives. The task force will look at whether new laws are needed to clamp down on those who promote religious extremism.
  • Anti-Muslim Hate Crimes Rise After Murder Of British Soldier
    Robert Siegel speaks with John Fisher Burns, London bureau chief for the New York Times, about how London is reacting to the religious and political extremism expressed by a man who murdered a soldier on a London street.
  • Florida Judge Denies Delay To George Zimmerman Trial
    In Sanford, Fla., a state judge ruled that George Zimmerman — the Neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin — will go to trial as scheduled on June 10. Zimmerman's defense asked the judge for more time and accused prosecutors of withholding important information. But on that — and many other motions — the judge ruled against Zimmerman and in favor of the state.
  • Cruise Industry Adopts Passenger 'Rights' As Incidents Mount
    About 2,200 passengers were being flown back to Baltimore after their cruise ship caught fire on its way to the Bahamas. It was the latest black eye for the cruise industry, which is now trying to reassure passengers it's OK for them to sail. An industry group said it has adopted a passenger "bill of rights."
  • Proposal To Sell Detroit's Art To Save The City Draws Outrage
    Detroit's emergency financial manager is considering selling artwork from The Detroit Institute of Arts to help raise money for the city's debt. Robert Siegel talks to John Gallagher of the Detroit Free Press for more.
  • Budget Cuts At National Parks May Affect Nearby Communities
    Last summer, America's national parks received an estimated 282 million visits. This year, sequestration may cut that number. The Interior Department says its operations will be disrupted by hiring freezes, overtime cuts, contracts, training programs and more.
  • Coming Home: The Woody Guthrie Center Opens In Tulsa
    The folk music icon's relationship with his home state has always been complicated. To many in Oklahoma, Guthrie's progressive political views didn't fit with a strong conservative streak during the Cold War period. His reputation there is now closer to full restoration as Tulsa opens his archives.
  • Darius Rucker: Busted Hearts And Pickup Trucks
    Rucker is a rock star, courtesy of his years as leader of Hootie and the Blowfish. But on his new country album, you hear the guy who still lives in and loves his home state of South Carolina, right down to its sweet tea and kudzu.
  • What Happens To Spelling Bee Kids? Years Later, The Prize Is Perspective
    For the middle schoolers competing in the Scripps National Spelling Bee this week, the experience will leave lasting memories. NPR tracked down former top spellers to see how they're faring, decades after their early successes.
  • Spelling Bees Have Roots In The Renaissance
    Melissa Block talks with lexicographer Peter Sokolowski, editor at large for Merriam-Webster, about the derivation of the word "bee" in "spelling bee." It turns out it has nothing to do with the insect.

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