All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Friday, May 17, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Almanzo 100Minn. cycling race gives athletes a rough ride
    Cyclists often hunt for smooth, rural roads to ride on. Emphasis here on 'smooth.' This weekend, more than 1,000 cyclists from around the country and Europe will pound the winding, backcountry roads just south of Rochester in a 100-mile race called Almanzo. The event has become one of the nation's premier gravel road events and the route will take riders on some of the region's most rugged and unforgiving roads.3:50 p.m.
  • Cube CriticsCube Critics movie review: The new Star Trek film
    Movie Maven Stephanie Curtis and arts reporter Euan Kerr review "Star Trek Into Darkness," in this week's Cube Critics video.3:54 p.m.
  • Front page, 1930Reviving the 'community sing' tradition: Minnesota Sounds and Voices
    The arrival of warm weather in Minneapolis marks a new beginning for "singing season," a nod to the past when thousands of people flocked to Minneapolis parks to sing together for the fun of it.4:54 p.m.
  • State Capitol repairsMinn. House defeats construction projects bill
    Republicans in the Minnesota House have blocked an $800 million package of public construction projects from moving forward this year, including the next phase of renovation work on the State Capitol.5:20 p.m.
  • Testing droneMilitary drone training comes to Camp Ripley
    The Minnesota Army National Guard showed off its new unmanned aircraft training facility at Camp Ripley today. The $4 million facility, the only one of its kind in the region, will improve training for National Guard soldiers who fly small drones to provide video surveillance.5:24 p.m.
  • Almanzo 100Minn. cycling race gives athletes a rough ride
    Cyclists often hunt for smooth, rural roads to ride on. Emphasis here on 'smooth.' This weekend, more than 1,000 cyclists from around the country and Europe will pound the winding, backcountry roads just south of Rochester in a 100-mile race called Almanzo. The event has become one of the nation's premier gravel road events and the route will take riders on some of the region's most rugged and unforgiving roads.5:54 p.m.
  • Cube CriticsCube Critics movie review: The new Star Trek film
    Movie Maven Stephanie Curtis and arts reporter Euan Kerr review "Star Trek Into Darkness," in this week's Cube Critics video.6:25 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Outgoing Acting IRS Director Grilled By House Lawmakers
    The House Ways and Means Committee became the first oversight panel in Congress to weigh in on the IRS tax-exempt group controversy on Friday morning.
  • Week In Politics: IRS, Benghazi Emails, AP Phone Logs
    Audie Cornish speaks with political commentators E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times. They discuss controversial IRS audits, the release of White House emails on Benghazi talking points and the Justice Department's seizure of AP phone logs.
  • Scientists Agree On Climate Change, Why Doesn't The Public?
    A new study confirms that the vast majority of scientists who research the climate accept that the planet is warming and human beings are largely responsible. Yet a large slice of the American public believes that scientists are deeply split about global warming.
  • Michigan LGBT Youth Center Does Outreach With A Dance 'Hook'
    The Ruth Ellis Center in Highland Park, Mich., is making an effort to meet its clients where they are — on the dance floor, specifically with the dance form known as "vogue." From there, the center can connect them with counseling, health services, tutoring and clean clothes.
  • After Deadly Chemical Plant Disasters, There's Little Action
    Proposals for chemical plants to use "inherently safer" design practices have been blocked by industry executives and their allies in Congress, despite deadly accidents and the risk of a potential terrorist attack that could harm an entire community or city.
  • Quinto Turns Inward To Find Spock's Soul
    Playing the famous half-Vulcan requires a little meditative depth and a lot of brow-shaving. Heroes villain Zachary Quinto plays Spock in the reboot of the Star Trek franchise, with the blessing of original Spock Leonard Nimoy. Quinto tells NPR about befriending Nimoy, shaping eyebrows and more.
  • U.N. Tries To Get Syria Peace Talks Back On Track
    U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon met with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday, saying it is important not to "lose momentum" in the effort to convene a peace conference on Syria. Ban was only the latest in a string of foreign dignitaries who have come to Russia, seeking Putin's blessing for such a conference, expected to be held in early June. There's a lot at stake. Russia has been a long-time supporter of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and continues to supply weapons to his regime. U.S. officials have said lately that those weapons include advanced missile systems for attacking ships and airplanes. If Assad already has such weapons, they could pose a real threat to international efforts to impose a no-fly zone, to deliver supplies to the rebels, or to maintain a maritime embargo.
  • Doctor: 'We Truly Are Failing The Syrian People'
    Stephen Cornish of Doctors Without Borders was recently in Syria. He talks to Audie Cornish about how medical personnel are managing to reach patients in the war-torn nation where he says there is a lack of respect for doctors on both sides of the conflict.
  • Boston Bombings Prompt Fresh Look At Unsolved Murders
    Authorities are revisiting a triple murder in the Boston suburb of Waltham. One of the victims may have been a friend of bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev would sometimes spar at the same mixed martial arts gym where the victim worked as an instructor.
  • Architect Of Argentina's 'Dirty War' Dies In Prison
    Jorge Rafael Videla was a former senior commander in the Argentine Army who was the de facto president of Argentina from 1976 to 1981. He came to power in a coup d'etat that deposed Isabel Martinez de Peron. After the return of a representative democratic government, he was prosecuted for large-scale human rights abuses and crimes against humanity that took place under his rule, including kidnappings or "forced disappearance," widespread torture and extrajudicial murder of activists and political opponents (either real, suspected or alleged) as well as their families, at secret concentration camps.

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