All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, May 17, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Dara Moskowitz GrumdahlDining with Dara: Urban fish farms may transform MInn. food scene
    When you think of Minnesota fish, you usually think of 10,000 lakes, a boat and a line, and a campfire fish fry. But that may be changing, according to our regular food and dining critic Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl. She's says there's a new indoor trend for raising fish in Minnesota.3:50 p.m.
  • Planting treesQ&A: Tree recovery in north Minneapolis
    Minneapolis Park Board forestry director Ralph Sievert talks to MPR News about the process of replacing the trees lost last in last May's tornado on the north side of the city.3:54 p.m.
  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:45 p.m.
  • Sandy and Joe FolioFire near Ely slowing down
    As firefighters continue to battle the wildfire south of Ely, authorities have lifted the evacuation order within city limits.4:50 p.m.
  • Potato fieldPesticide drift confirmed from some Minnesota farm fields
    People in some Minnesota communities are routinely exposed to pesticide drift from nearby farm fields, according to a new study released Thursday. The chemical in question, a commonly used fungicide called chlorothalonil, is under increasing scrutiny.4:55 p.m.
  • Health officials count surging number of pertussis cases
    The number of pertussis cases in Minnesota is surging, approaching 700 cases of the highly-contagious respiratory disease, according to the Minnesota Department of Health.5:20 p.m.
  • Priests oppose marriage amendmentSome Minn. priests differ with Catholic church over marriage amendment
    A group of 80 former Catholic priests on Thursday announced their opposition to the constitutional marriage amendment. Also coming forward to oppose the amendment were three retired priests who are still part of the church.5:24 p.m.
  • Polica InstudioIs Minnesota music in a golden age?
    You can't scientifically measure whether a music scene is going through what some might call a "heyday." But there are signs. Indicators. And some are too big to ignore.5:50 p.m.
  • Planting treesQ&A: Tree recovery in north Minneapolis
    Minneapolis Park Board forestry director Ralph Sievert talks to MPR News about the process of replacing the trees lost last in last May's tornado on the north side of the city.6:14 p.m.
  • Dara Moskowitz GrumdahlDining with Dara: Urban fish farms may transform MInn. food scene
    When you think of Minnesota fish, you usually think of 10,000 lakes, a boat and a line, and a campfire fish fry. But that may be changing, according to our regular food and dining critic Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl. She's says there's a new indoor trend for raising fish in Minnesota.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • An Afghan Shoots, A Marine Dies, Mistrust Grows
    It's not clear what motivated an Afghan sergeant to fatally shoot a U.S. Marine sergeant earlier this month. But American troops are increasingly wary of their Afghan partners after repeated shootings.
  • Civilians Flee, Soldiers Dig In On Sudanese Frontier
    Sudan and South Sudan are still threatening one another along their borders. The U.N. is warning both Sudans that they could face sanctions if they can't reverse their escalating feud.
  • The Politics Of Catholic Schools' Graduation Speakers
    The Catholic Archdiocese of Washington, D.C., is up in arms over Georgetown University's invitation to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to speak during commencement weekend. Church officials are upset about Sebelius' role in the creation of the contraception mandate in the federal health reform law. It's one of several controversies surrounding graduation speakers that have cropped up this spring.
  • Brain Implant Lets Quadriplegics Move Robotic Limbs
    A new study looks at how paralyzed people are able to move robotic arms with their thoughts, due to a microchip that is implanted in their brains that sends neural signals to a computer. Robert Siegel speaks with the lead author of the study, Dr. Leigh Hochberg, neurologist and engineer at Brown University and the VA Medical Center in Providence, R.I.
  • Ancient Deep-Sea Bacteria Are In No Hurry To Eat
    Back when the dinosaurs ruled the Earth, some hardy bacteria took up residence at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Eighty six million years later, they're still there. And a new study says they're living out the most Spartan lifestyle known on this planet.
  • The Secret Life Of California's World-Class Strawberries
    We may romanticize that strawberries are grown down the road, but most of them come from California. And a complex web of plant cloning practices, relocation and fumigation has cropped up to keep it that way. Although scientists are exploring new options, like soil-free growing.
  • Bigger, Blander, Blegh: Why Are Strawberries Worse?
    Melissa Block talks with Marvin Pritts, a Cornell horticulture professor, about why store-bought strawberries aren't as tasty as the ones you might pick on your own.
  • War Vets To Protest, Return Medals At NATO Summit
    Anti-war activists are gearing up for a march and rally in Chicago this weekend. As the 2012 NATO Summit gets underway there, members of Veterans Against the War plan to ceremoniously return their medals.
  • Two Gray Titles, One Sexy Mix-Up
    What happens when two books with similar names are out at the same time? Well, when one is historical fiction set in Lithuania and the other an S&M novel that's ripping up the best-sellers list, some interesting teachable moments.
  • Cecil Taylor: The Pianist Who's Also An Orchestra
    He broke all the rules of jazz and improvised music — and that was in the 1950s. Now 83 and idolized by musicians, the great improviser is celebrated for developing a unique language at the keyboard.

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