All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Moving dayState support for elderly faces uncertain future
    With the second-highest rate of elderly poverty in central Minnesota, Todd County relies heavily on state support to care for its seniors. But Medical Assistance has been the subject of budget cuts recently, and those cuts may be just the beginning.3:50 p.m.
  • Cities group reacts to unallotment decision
    Among the biggest losers in the unallotment process were Minnesota's cities. The governor cut $192 million in local government aid that the cities would otherwise have received from the state.4:44 p.m.
  • Gov. Tim PawlentyCourt's ruling makes state budget picture more complicated
    A Minnesota Supreme Court ruling that struck down a unilateral cut Gov. Tim Pawlenty made last year could make the Legislature's task of balancing the budget more complicated.5:15 p.m.
  • Viking fansVikings stadium bill suffers setbacks
    The Vikings stadium bill is on shaky ground after going down to defeat in a House panel and as lawmakers and Gov. Tim Pawlenty grapple with a court ruling over last year's budget cuts.5:20 p.m.
  • Moving dayState support for elderly faces uncertain future
    With the second-highest rate of elderly poverty in central Minnesota, Todd County relies heavily on state support to care for its seniors. But Medical Assistance has been the subject of budget cuts recently, and those cuts may be just the beginning.5:45 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Times Square Suspect Talking; Questions Remain
    Investigators have had the suspect in the Times Square bombing attempt in custody for nearly two days now. And authorities say Faisal Shahzad has been talking. One thing U.S. officials want to know is who he trained with while in Pakistan. Michele Norris talks to NPR's Dina Temple-Raston. Sources tell Temple-Raston that Shahzad's training may have been with the group Lashkar-e-Taiba, a Pakistani group perhaps best known for the terror attack in Mumbai a couple of years ago.
  • NYPD Chief Raymond Kelly On Bomb Investigation
    Robert Siegel talks to New York City Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly about the arrest and investigation of Times Square bombing suspect Faisal Shahzad.
  • In Pakistan, Shahzad's Family, Friends Express Dismay
    The village of Mohib Banda, in Pakistan's Northwest Frontier Province, is the ancestral family home of Faisal Shahzad, the alleged Times Square bomber. There, family and friends say he came from a "secular and liberal" background.
  • Protests Turn Deadly In Greece
    Tens of thousands of outraged Greeks took to the streets on Wednesday to protest harsh new spending cuts aimed at saving their country from bankruptcy. Workers walked off the job in a 24-hour nationwide general strike, which later turned deadly.
  • Commentary: Europe's Economic Crisis
    NPR Senior News Analyst Dan Schorr reflects on the development of the European Union's common market, and the economic fallout from the financial crisis in Greece.
  • Soda In America: Children And Families
    This week, we're examining soda in America, and today, a look at children and families. Michele Norris talks with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack about his goals for nutrition standards in schools, about the choices he hopes young people and their families will learn to make, and about his own soda habits. She also speaks with community health activist Nura Green of the Aban Institute about the challenges children and families face in urban environments, where there are few healthy choices.
  • The History Of World's Fairs
    As the Shanghai World Expo kicks off, we take a look back at the lasting legacy of past world's fairs. Many products we use every day gained their fame at the fairs: escalators, televisions, Campbell's soup. Robert Siegel talks to Montana State University history professor Robert Rydell, who's written extensively on the expos of the early 20th century.
  • Remembering Ernie Harwell, The Voice Of The Tigers
    Ernie Harwell, the longtime radio announcer for the Detroit Tigers, died Tuesday at 92. Harwell called the games for more than 40 years. Harwell was an old and trusted friend to a generation of Michigan kids who grew up listening to him.
  • BP Caps One Of Two Wells
    The Coast Guard says oil company BP has capped one of three leaks at a well in the Gulf of Mexico. But the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says oil is still flowing into the Gulf at a rate of more than 200,000 gallons a day.
  • Helping Animals In The Path Of Gulf Oil Spill
    In the path of the growing Gulf oil spill are the many species of birds that make their home along Louisiana's fragile wetlands. What efforts are being made to help these animals once they and their habitats become drenched with oil? Michele Norris talks to Michael Seymour, a bird expert with Louisiana's Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, to find out.

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