All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, April 22, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.3:44 p.m.
  • Medicine disposalStudy finds levels of pharmaceuticals in wastewater widespread
    In the most comprehensive study of a variety of chemical compounds coming from municipal sewage plants, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency confirmed widespread, but low concentrations of water contamination from human medications and antibiotics.3:50 p.m.
  • Minnesota Original logoShining a spotlight on Minnesota Originals
    A new weekly series on the arts premieres tonight on Minnesota Public Television stations across the states. The series is called "Minnesota Original," and each program features several artists from around the state, describing what they do in their own words.3:53 p.m.
  • Moose Lake Correctional FacilityAt Moose Lake, a facility some say is more prison than therapy
    Inside the Moose Lake facility are two steel and concrete buildings that house more than 400 men who have completed sentences for sex crimes. The men are still behind bars because county judges found they were too dangerous to return to communities and placed them under civil commitment.4:50 p.m.
  • Mahdi Hassan AliTeen shooting suspect to get X-rays to determine his age
    A teen charged with murder in the shooting deaths of three men in a south Minneapolis convenience store in January will get dental X-rays to determine his age.5:20 p.m.
  • Minnesota State CapitolSome legislators skip votes to campaign
    Lawmakers who are running for higher office in Minnesota have all missed floor votes during the current legislative session -- sometimes because they're on the campaign trail.5:23 p.m.
  • Medicine disposalStudy finds levels of pharmaceuticals in wastewater widespread
    In the most comprehensive study of a variety of chemical compounds coming from municipal sewage plants, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency confirmed widespread, but low concentrations of water contamination from human medications and antibiotics.5:47 p.m.
  • Overheard in MinneapolisOverheard conversation becomes improv theater
    The content on the "Overheard in Minneapolis" website has become the catalyst for a new improv theater production.5:53 p.m.
  • Nina ArchabalNina Archabal to retire as head of Minn. Historical Society
    Minnesota Historical Society Director Nina Archabal is retiring after serving in that capacity for 23 years.6:20 p.m.
  • Minnesota Original logoShining a spotlight on Minnesota Originals
    A new weekly series on the arts premieres tonight on Minnesota Public Television stations across the states. The series is called "Minnesota Original," and each program features several artists from around the state, describing what they do in their own words.6:24 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Obama Urges Wall Street To Support Overhaul
    President Obama made his pitch for rewriting financial rules Thursday in the nation's financial capital. He told an audience in lower Manhattan that without new curbs on reckless financial behavior, the U.S. is at risk of another economic meltdown.
  • Wall Street Reacts To Obama's Push For Regulation
    President Obama said in his speech that he was speaking just a few blocks from Wall Street. In fact he was in Greenwich Village — a slightly more bohemian location, and about 30 blocks from the New York Stock Exchange. NPR's Robert Smith reports on how the speech was playing down there.
  • Bribery In India: A Good Thing?
    In many countries, if you want to get things done, a small envelope of cash can speed you on your way. You want that business license, without the hassles? No problem — for a price. NPR's David Kestenbaum, from our Planet Money team, was in India, where low-level bribes are common. He reports that economists say sometimes, bribes can actually be a good thing.
  • China Sets Sights On Enhanced Air, Sea Power
    China is in the midst of an ambitious bid to modernize its military by the middle of this century. A key part of this effort is to downsize its army while beefing up its air force and navy, enabling China to project military force farther beyond its borders.
  • Remembering D.C. Educator Brian Betts
    There are remarkable educators toiling in our public schools who most of us will never meet or hear about. Their influence on kids and their community can be profound, but they'll never be the subject of a movie or a book. Brian Betts, a middle-school principal in Washington, D.C., was one of them. Betts was found slain in his home last week. He was 42.
  • Grandparents Often Help Support Kids With Autism
    For many children with autism, grandparents play a key role in their care. According to a survey of 2,600 grandparents, many contributed their retirement savings toward care or even relocated to be closer to their grandchild. And 30 percent of the grandparents surveyed were the first to notice the child's developmental problems.
  • Tracking Volcano Ash To Improve Flight Safety
    The eruption in Iceland has triggered an intense effort to improve our ability to detect volcanic ash clouds and forecast their movement in the atmosphere. Eruptions are surprisingly common. And more precise information about them could help reduce uncertainty about the threats they pose to air travel.
  • The 5 Browns: Blending Pop And Classical
    Piano-playing siblings from Utah, The 5 Browns' members were once the media darlings of classical music. They received the kind of mainstream press coverage most young classical musicians could only dream of. Now, a few years following the frenzy, the group is still building its career.
  • How Was The West Won? With Hospitality
    Fred Harvey was the Ray Kroc before McDonald's, the J.W. Marriott before Marriott Hotels. A new book by Stephen Fried looks at how Harvey civilized the West with his railroad restaurants and changed America's eating habits.
  • When The 'Trust Hormone' Is Out Of Balance
    How much we trust the people around us may be strongly influenced by biology. Studies have found that levels of a hormone called oxytocin can change how trusting we are. Some people, like 9-year-old Isabelle, are born with a genetic disorder that may interfere with the body's regulation of this hormone. Isabelle has no social fear. She literally trusts everyone.

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