All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, April 8, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Mowing Target Field grassTarget Field certified greenest in U.S.
    The Minnesota Twins announced that Target Field has been LEED certified at a Silver level, which makes it the greenest ballpark in the country.3:50 p.m.
  • Art gymArt meets fitness at exhibit in Fargo
    Art studios are often places of quiet contemplation, but in a Fargo studio recently, an art gym has artists grunting in pain and gasping for air.3:54 p.m.
  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:44 p.m.
  • Fire aftermathMinneapolis readies new fire inspection system
    After a second victim of a fatal Minneapolis fire was identified on Thursday, Minneapolis city officials say they are preparing to roll out a new system that will increase the frequency of inspections for buildings with a history of violations.5:20 p.m.
  • Jones, Boelter, La RosaPetters gets 50 years in prison for fraud scheme
    Tom Petters said before the courtroom Thursday morning that he was filled with "pain and anguish" for the people who lost more than $3.5 billion in an investment scam. But he stopped short of admitting wrongdoing.5:24 p.m.
  • Mowing Target Field grassTarget Field certified greenest in U.S.
    The Minnesota Twins announced that Target Field has been LEED certified at a Silver level, which makes it the greenest ballpark in the country.5:50 p.m.
  • Art gymArt meets fitness at exhibit in Fargo
    Art studios are often places of quiet contemplation, but in a Fargo studio recently, an art gym has artists grunting in pain and gasping for air.5:54 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Gunshots And Uncertainty In Kyrgyzstan's Capital
    On the streets of Kyrgyzstan's capital, Bishkek, there is a general sense of lawlessness. After bloody protests, the president has fled, the opposition says they are now in charge, and gangs of looters are wandering the city. The political upheaval has frustrated Kyrgyzstan's citizens, as well as the United States, which relies on a military base in the country to fight the war in Afghanistan.
  • Kyrgyzstan: A Primer
    Kyrgyzstan is home to about 5 million people, mostly Muslim. It's about the size of South Dakota. To learn more about this Central Asian nation, Melissa Block talks to Martha Brill Olcott of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, who specializes in that region.
  • The Art Exhibition That May Knock Your Socks Off
    The yearlong exhibit "Socks: Between You and Your Shoes" opened this month at the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto. Curator Elizabeth Semmelhack says as far as she knows, it's the world's first sock exhibition. Highlights include stockings worn by Queen Victoria and socks made out of human hair.
  • Rescuers Face Setback In West Virginia
    Dangerous gases on Thursday forced rescue workers to abandon the search for four coal miners missing since Monday, when an explosion killed 25 colleagues.
  • West Virginia Governor On Mine Explosion
    Melissa Block talks to West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin, who has been meeting with families of miners killed and still missing after Monday's explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine.
  • Relationship Between Karzai, U.S. Deteriorates
    Afghan President Hamid Karzai and the Obama administration have had a tense relationship from the start. But it seems to be worsening, as Karzai lashes out against U.S. pressure on him, and the U.S. urges caution if he still wants to meet with President Obama in May.
  • U.S. Won't Review Inquiry Into 2007 Baghdad Video
    The U.S. military has decided not to review or reinvestigate a 2007 American helicopter attack on a group of suspected insurgents in Baghdad. The attack killed 12, including two Reuters employees. U.S. Central Command says there were already two Army investigations back in 2007 that exonerated the helicopter crews. The investigation found that some of the men were carrying weapons. But NPR has learned that there was debate within the military about a specific part of the attack — the targeting of a van that came to the aid of the wounded. Michele Norris talks to NPR's Tom Bowman, who has the details.
  • Former Citigroup Execs Contrite On Financial Crisis
    Two former Citigroup executives expressed regrets Thursday that they didn't do a better job of anticipating the financial crisis that nearly destroyed their bank. Robert Rubin, a Treasury secretary during the Clinton administration, and Charles Prince, Citi's former CEO, told a congressional panel looking into the causes of the crisis that they had missed the powerful combination of forces that created tens of billions of dollars in losses for the bank.
  • Letters: West Virginia Mine Explosion
    NPR listeners respond to an interview with the relatives of a miner who died in the West Virginia explosion. Melissa Block and Michele Norris read from listeners' e-mails.
  • New Orleans Locals Put Their Stamp On HBO's 'Treme'
    The creators of The Wire are back with a new HBO series called Treme, set in New Orleans three months after Hurricane Katrina. And locals are a key part of the production. One of them, Kermit Ruffins, plays himself. He hopes Treme will spark a jazz revival and shed light on what happened after the storm.

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