All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Friday, February 15, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • A concept for a new Vikings stadiumMortenson will build new Vikings stadium
    The plan to build a new stadium for the Minnesota Vikings cleared one of its final hurdles on Friday as the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority picked Mortenson Construction as the project's general contractor.3:50 p.m.
  • The Cube CriticsThe Cube Critics: A good day to talk movies with coworkers
    It's a wrap, at a very crowded cube today as some news colleagues converged on The Cube Critics to talk movie trailers, and the costs of streaming versus renting.3:54 p.m.
  • Sen. Amy KlobucharPoliGraph: Klobuchar claim on foreign workers tough to nail down
    Do U.S. immigration policies drive off skilled foreign graduates of American universities?4:45 p.m.
  • Cleaning beaver peltMinn. trappers see boom year as fur prices rise
    Nearly 10,000 people bought trapping licenses this season in the state, more than any time in the past 25 years. The industry is controversial for some, and for others, a way of life.4:50 p.m.
  • Police officialsMinneapolis South High officials look to move beyond brawl
    Classes were in session Friday at Minneapolis South High School, the day after a lunch room brawl involving hundreds of students. School officials say they are trying to move beyond yesterday's fight, which some students say was caused by racial tension at the school. The incident has other districts examining how they respond to problems among groups of students.5:20 p.m.
  • Virtual trainingPhotos: Video game sharpens Minn. soldiers' skills
    The Minnesota National Guard is using simulators to train troops in very real and potentially deadly skills -- from shooting to driving to combat. But some soldiers say the simulator's graphics are weak; they prefer Call of Duty: Black Ops 2.5:24 p.m.
  • Osmo Vanska and orchestraMinnesota Orchestra lockout continues into fifth month
    Minnesota Orchestra musicians have been locked out for five months, with few signs that it will be ending anytime soon. Orchestra President Michael Henson and principal cellist Tony Ross will join us to talk about the state of the negotiations.5:51 p.m.
  • A concept for a new Vikings stadiumMortenson will build new Vikings stadium
    The plan to build a new stadium for the Minnesota Vikings cleared one of its final hurdles on Friday as the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority picked Mortenson Construction as the project's general contractor.5:54 p.m.
  • The Cube CriticsThe Cube Critics: A good day to talk movies with coworkers
    It's a wrap, at a very crowded cube today as some news colleagues converged on The Cube Critics to talk movie trailers, and the costs of streaming versus renting.6:25 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • President's New Voting Commission Greeted With Skepticism
    So far, there are few details about the new commission aimed at fixing problems at the polls. But the reaction from voting-rights advocates has been lukewarm at best, while Republicans have been dismissive.
  • Week In Politics: State Of The Union, Chuck Hagel
    Robert Siegel speaks with political commentators E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and syndicated columnist Mona Charen. The discuss the State of the Union, and Chuck Hagel's nomination for defense secretary.
  • 'Many Worlds': A Film That Keeps Its Eye On The Audience
    Many Worlds is a 15-minute drama from Alexis Kirke, of the Interdisciplinary Center for Computer Music Research at Plymouth University in England. The film, about a bizarre physics experiment cooked up by a depressed girl and unleashed on her friends, "reads the minds" and the bodies of the audience, and changes its plot while they watch it.
  • Weeping Olympian Pistorius Faces Murder Charge In Court
    South African sports star Oscar Pistorius broke down in tears when he appeared in court Friday to face a charge of murder in the shooting death of his girlfriend on Valentine's Day. The double amputee is known as the Blade Runner for his athletic prowess on the track.
  • When Sports Icons Fall Short
    In the wake of a murder charge against legless sprinter Oscar Pistorius, sportswriter Stefan Fatsis and Robert Siegel discuss the elevation of sports stars beyond acclaim for their physical gifts.
  • Checking In On Chicago Schools' 'Safe Passage' Program
    In Chicago on Friday, President Obama explored his home city's gun violence problem at an appearance at a South Side high school — the same school NPR's David Schaper visited two years ago to report on its "safe passage" program to help students get to and from school safely. Schaper returns to see how the program and other anti-violence initiatives are working.
  • Would More Secure Doors Have Slowed Newtown Shooter?
    Adam Lanza shot his way into Sandy Hook Elementary School by blowing holes in the school's front door. But had that door been something more sophisticated and more secure, might Lanza at least have been slowed in his attack? One company that devotes itself to just this question is Assa Abloy, an outfit based in New Haven, Conn., that says it specializes in "secure, safe and convenient door solutions."
  • After Sandy, Not All Sand Dunes Are Created Equal
    In New Jersey, thousands of discarded Christmas trees have dodged the wood chipper and hit the beach instead. They're being used to jump-start new dunes, but scientists warn that these man-made dunes could be less sturdy than dunes that form naturally.
  • The Dark Side To French-African Ties
    President Francois Hollande's visit to Mali, after French troops routed Islamist extremists, brings to mind France's long relationship with its former colonies in Africa. African troops helped France and the allies defeat Hitler's forces, and Hollande expressed gratitude for that while he was in Mali. But there's also a dark side to the French-African connection.
  • Say Yes To 'No': Retro Political Thriller Packs A Timely Punch
    Imbued with a retro, classic feel, the stunning Chilean drama No takes a powerful look at the positive effects of political advertising. It's a message American audiences might marvel at, but this Oscar-nominated film definitely delivers. (Recommended)

Program Archive
  
February 2013
S M T W T F S
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28    
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

Fresh Air®

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland
Win Your Dinner Party

The Dinner Party Download™

A fast, funny digest of the week's most interesting news, cuisine, cocktails and culture.

Services