All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Today's Question: Who Are You?
    There's a growing ambiguity in how Americans describe their ethnic backgrounds. There is also a growing number of mixed-race marriages producing multiracial children. So for Today's Question, we asked: "Who are you?"3:28 p.m.
  • Collapsed MetrodomeViability of Metrodome in question as plans for new stadium edge toward Capitol
    The Minnesota Vikings and some key state lawmakers say they will roll out a plan for a new stadium for the team in coming weeks, but even its detractors say the Metrodome -- despite roof troubles -- could be viable for years to come.3:49 p.m.
  • The cost of textbooks
    A new report by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education says the large number of players in the national textbook market makes it tough to enforce major changes at the state level. On Campus blogger Alex Friedrich talks about the issue of textbook reform.3:53 p.m.
  • DaytonDayton: Cuts will have 'devastating effects' on poorest Minnesotans
    "I hate what I'm having to do," the governor said at a Minneapolis event Monday organized by the Downtown Congregations to End Homelessness.4:50 p.m.
  • Bluegrass at the GuthrieA career in the theater as a composer
    It's preview week for the Guthrie Theater's new production of Shakespeare's "The Winters Tale," and one of the people scrambling to get things ready is composer Adam Wernick. Just as the actors are honing their performances Wernick will refine the music right up to Friday's opening night.4:52 p.m.
  • Emmer and DaytonReport shows influence of outside groups on gov campaign
    Democrat Mark Dayton and his allies outspent Republican Tom Emmer and his supporters by nearly 2-1 in last year's race for governor. Campaign finance reports released Tuesday also show that spending by outside political groups outpaced spending by candidates.5:20 p.m.
  • Norm Hudson of TLK IndustriesRecord prices boost Minn.'s copper-nickel projects
    Copper set new records earlier this year and continues trading near record highs of over $4.40 a pound, pushing cash into northeast Minnesota's developing copper-nickel projects.5:24 p.m.
  • Collapsed MetrodomeViability of Metrodome in question as plans for new stadium edge toward Capitol
    The Minnesota Vikings and some key state lawmakers say they will roll out a plan for a new stadium for the team in coming weeks, but even its detractors say the Metrodome -- despite roof troubles -- could be viable for years to come.5:50 p.m.
  • The cost of textbooks
    A new report by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education says the large number of players in the national textbook market makes it tough to enforce major changes at the state level. On Campus blogger Alex Friedrich talks about the issue of textbook reform.5:55 p.m.
  • Today's Question: Who Are You?
    There's a growing ambiguity in how Americans describe their ethnic backgrounds. There is also a growing number of mixed-race marriages producing multiracial children. So for Today's Question, we asked: "Who are you?"6:27 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Egypt's Mubarak Says He Won't Run Again
    Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced Tuesday that he will step down at the end of his term, when the country holds a presidential election in September. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro speaks to host Robert Siegel about the latest developments in Egypt.
  • Reports: White House Urged Mubarak Not To Run Again
    President Obama reportedly sent word Tuesday to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak that he should not seek re-election. This is a more aggressive step from the White House than we have seen. For more, NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks to host Michele Norris.
  • Jordan's King Sacks Cabinet After Protests
    In Jordan, King Abdullah has appointed a new prime minister. While the protests in Egypt are gaining the most attention, smaller protests in the Hashimite Kingdom called for lower food prices and an end to corruption. Host Robert Siegel talks to Amman-based reporter Dale Gavlak about the new prime minister.
  • N.Y. Governor Proposes Deep Spending Cuts
    With federal stimulus dollars gone, states are planning big spending cuts. How bad can it get? Let's take a look at New York state, where Gov. Andrew Cuomo unveiled his budget on Tuesday.
  • The 'Five Key Decisions' For Every Investor
    We recently noted the passing of Gordon Murray, the retired investment banker who, when he was diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor, wrote a brief and handy book with his financial adviser, Dan Goldie. Host Robert Siegel speaks to Goldie about that book, The Investment Answer: The Five Key Decisions Every Investor Needs To Make.
  • The Real CSI: Death Detective Dysfunction
    Every day, nearly 7,000 people die in America. And when these deaths happen suddenly, or under suspicious circumstances, we assume there will be a thorough investigation, just like we see on TV. But the reality is very different.
  • Letters: Challenger Disaster; Pessimism
    Our coverage of the 25th anniversary of the Challenger disaster brought back memories for many of our listeners. Also, one listener asks: "Is NPR run by a bunch of pessimists?" Hosts Robert Siegel and Michele Norris read letters from our listeners.
  • A Parade, Restored: A Maurice Sendak Mural Goes From Bedroom To Gallery
    The only mural Maurice Sendak is known to have ever painted has been donated by the one-time children for whom it was made, and is being restored for display. We talk to the artist and the donors, 50 years after the piece's creation.
  • Mubarak: 'Choice Is Between Chaos And Stability'
    Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said Tuesday that he will not seek re-election when his term ends later this year. The announcement came the same day demonstrators gathered for a major march from central Cairo to the presidential palace to press for Mubarak's ouster. Host Robert Siegel speaks to NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson for the latest.
  • Cairo Protesters To Mubarak: Leave Now, Not Later
    Michele Norris speaks to NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, who is in Cairo's Tahir Square. The throngs of protesters who have gathered there appear unhappy with President Hosni Mubarak's statement Tuesday that he would not seek re-election. They are chanting for Mubarak to leave now, not later.

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